#OTalk 19 February 2019 – Assessments

OTalk 19th February 2019 (8-9 pm GMT)
This week’s #OTalk is on the topic of choosing assessments and will be hosted by Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) from York St John University and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61) in the UK.

Here’s what Alison and Diane had to say:

Assessment and outcome measurement are fundamental aspects of the Occupational Therapy process and learning about assessment and evaluation is a core component of occupational therapy education. Assessment requires occupational therapists to select and apply a range of informal and standardised data collection methods (interviews, observations, questionnaires and document review) and access a range of sources (the person, other health and social care staff involved in the person’s care, and informal care givers). Information collected through assessment needs to be accurate because it informs ‘the negotiation of outcomes, setting of goals, and selection of therapeutic interventions’ (Laver-Fawcett, 2012, p. 604). Assessment is usually conducted at several points during the occupational therapy process, this can include: an initial assessment to inform goal setting and provide a baseline; ongoing assessment to review the person’s response to intervention; evaluation of outcomes at the end of intervention; and post-discharge follow-up review (Creek, 2003).

So the choices we make about what assessments to use and when to use them are critically important.

Whether you are an experienced researcher, a clinician or a student please join us on 19th February for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experience. It is never too early in your occupational therapy career to start considering why you choose the assessments and outcome measures you use.

Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus our chat:

1. What are we looking for in an assessment?
2. When choosing an assessment what does it need to have?
3. Thinking about assessment tools or standard measures – what is the most important feature it has?
4. Why do you choose the measures you use?
5. If learning about assessment and measures what would you like to know?
6. What was the most useful tip you have for thinking about which assessment tool to use?
7. Do you have a particular resource, website or book that you use that you find helpful and would recommend to OT students and colleagues?

References:

Creek J (2003) Occupational therapy defined as a complex intervention. London: College of Occupational Therapists.

Laver-Fawcett, A J (2014) Routine standardised outcome measurement to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions: essential or optional? Ergoterapeuten, 4, 28-37. [accessed 17.2.2019]
http://www.ergoterapeuten.no/Admin/Public/Download.aspx?file=Files%2fFiles%2fFagartikler%2foutcome.pdf

Resources:

College of Occupational Therapists’ (COT; 2017) Position Statement: Occupational therapists’ use of standardized outcome measures. London, COT. Available from: file:///C:/Users/a.laverfawcett/Downloads/COT-Position-Statement-measuring-outcomes%20(1).pdf [accessed 17.2.2019]

Laver Fawcett AJ (2007) Principles of Assessment and Outcome Measurement for Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists: Theory, Skills and Application. Chichester. Wiley. Available from:
https://www.wiley.com/en-gb/Principles+of+Assessment+and+Outcome+Measurement+for+Occupational+Therapists+and+Physiotherapists%3A+Theory%2C+Skills+and+Application-p-9781861564801 [accessed 16.2.2019]

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (nd). Developing an assessment tool or outcome measure. Available from: https://www.rcot.co.uk/practice-resources/library-resources/assessments-and-outcome-measures [accessed 16.2.2019]

Post Chat

Host: Prof Diane Cox @dianecox61

Support on Otalk account: @colourful_ot

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

The Numbers

1.295M Impressions
400 Tweets
40 Participants
98 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

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#OTalk – 12th February 2019 – TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

This weeks chat will be hosted by Ruth Ndlovu @NeuroOT_Ruth.

TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

A severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a condition where the patient has been in an unconscious state for 6 hours a more and to be in post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) for more than 24hours (Headway 2019). Patients who present with severe TBI are often hospitalised and depending on the severity of their injury they can be referred for rehabilitation.

Cognitive rehabilitation attempts to enhance functioning and independence in patients with cognitive impairments following brain injury or disease. Cognitive rehab consists of a diverse of interventions including restorative and compensatory approach. Restorative approach aims to restore functions that have been impaired following injury or diseases through task repetition. Whereas compensatory approach aims to restore function by use of compensatory strategies such as external memory aids e.g. calendars, diaries and use of electronic devices.

  1. What assessments/tools do you use in your setting for patients in PTA post TBI?
  2. As a team/discipline, how do you determine a patient is out of PTA?
  3. What cognitive assessments are commonly used for patients with a TBI? These can be standardised or non-standardised.
  4. What cognitive interventions or approaches do you use for TBI patients?

References:

Headway (2019) Traumatic Brain Injury [online] accessed on 27.01.2019 at https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/types-of-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury/

Post Chat

Host: Ruth Ndlovu @NeuroOT_Ruth.

Support on Otalk account:

Online Transcript

12th Feb 2019 #OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

The Numbers

921.753K Impressions
188 Tweets
25 Participants
61 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

#OTalk Research is back for its first chat of 2019. Our first talk is on an important step of any research, the pilot study. #Otalk Research Tuesday 5 th February, 2019

A pilot study is a small study conducted in advance of a planned project, specifically to
test aspects of the research design and to allow necessary adjustment before final
commitment to the research design. A study should not be simply labelled a ‘pilot study’
by researchers hoping to justify a small sample size. Regardless of the research design,
quantitative or qualitative, the pilot study is an important part of the research design
process which should inform researchers about the best way to conduct the future, full
scale project.
Join Jenny and Nikki from the #Otalk team in next week’s chat if you have experience of
using pilot studies, in the process of designing a pilot study or would like to learn more to
help you evaluate studies. We will be discussing;

1. What the term ‘pilot study’ means to you and what you think are the main reasons to
conduct a pilot study.
2. Your experiences of conducting, observing or taking part in a pilot study
3. Benefits observed from pilot studies
4. Challenges in relation to pilot studies
5. When you know if you have done enough piloting to execute a larger scale study

Post Chat

Host: @NikkiDanielsOT and @preston_jenny

Support on Otalk: @NikkiDanielsOT and @preston_jenny

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 5th 2019

The Numbers

790.477K Impressions
218 Tweets
30 Participants
105 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 29th January 2019 – What drivers and barriers affect final transition point of final year student to newly qualified occupational therapists?

This week Emma (@emmaspellmanOT) wants some help with her PhD research:

I am an Occupational Therapy lecturer, PhD student and volunteer member of the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) North West Regional Committee.

Since my own BSc study in occupational therapy, I’ve been interested in what drivers and barriers affect that final transition point of final year student to newly qualified occupational therapists.  Subsequently I’m currently doing doctoral research into this subject which will build on current research that indicates factors of professional socialisation, knowledge/skills acquisition and teaching/learning styles/behaviours. There is a gap in the current UK literature which is the combination of voices of student, educator and lecturer.

Questions for consideration:

Question 1: What does being ‘prepared for practice’ mean to you?

Question 2: Who is involved in preparing students to be able to practice and please give an example if you can?

Question 3: How you have successfully achieved preparedness for practice as a student or how you might have helped a student achieve this?

Question 4: What key challenges or barriers do you feel there are to a final year occupational therapy student feeling prepared for practice?

Question 5: What else could be done to improve preparing students to practice?  

Participation in this OTalk chat doesn’t make you a research participant in my study. However, please would you consider my using your tweets for analysis of the OTtalk transcript?  If you do consider this, please be assured of anonymity.  Those among you familiar to OTalk will know that you can choose anonymity if you wish. You might already protect your own anonymity on your twitter accounts and you can protect your tweets from whomever you wish.   I will ensure anonymity in the write up of the pilot study. There is a possibility of participants being identifiable from any quotes used within the final write up of the research, however, care will be taken within this to remove any identifiable information, including the use of pseudonyms and omitting any organisational information that may be included.

For those that may consider allowing me to use their tweets for my doctoral study, please view the documents linked below:

If you choose to allow me to use your tweets for my pilot doctoral study and so become a research participant,  please read the participant information form above and then the consent form, if you are still happy to be a research participant please sign the consent form and send this to : emma.spellman@cumbria.ac.uk.

Thank you in anticipation, Emma

Anyone interested in being a research participant in Emma’s study and allowing her to use their anonymised tweets should contact her directly on the e-mail address provided above.

Post Chat

Host: Emma (@emmaspellmanOT)

Support on @OTalk_ Account: @colourful_ot

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

151.489K Impressions
27 Tweets
13 Participants
25 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 22nd January 2019 – Being a rotational OT

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “being a rotational occupational therapist” and will be hosted by Kerri Schubert (@Kerri_schOT).

 Here is what Kerri had to say…

I love my job – I’m a rotational Occupational Therapist and since qualifying and taking on this role, I have rotated into 3 different clinical areas. I really enjoy the variety that comes with being a rotational OT and think that by rotating into different departments I get to constantly learn new skills and understand the role of OT in a range of different settings. I hope that by rotating around different specialties I will feel like a well-rounded, experienced OT, which will enable me to eventually progress into a more senior role, wherever that may be!

Polglase and Treseder (2012:153) addressed the challenge of choosing between a rotational and static job post-qualifying. They suggest that being a rotational OT allows a new therapist to build skills in several fields and can contribute to them being a holistic OT. They also highlight the benefits of being a static OT, balancing the discussion.

Personally, I applied for a rotational job over a static post when I left university as I thought it would better my career prospects in the future by allowing me to experience numerous OT roles within an acute and community setting. However, I know OT’s who took their first job as a static post and love it! I don’t think there is a right or a wrong choice – it’s purely circumstantial and based on people’s preferences… and I’d love to hear what you guys think!

Some questions to consider:

What Occupational Therapy role do you plan to take on/did you take on as your first job?

What do you think are the benefits of being a rotational Occupational Therapist?

What do you think might be a drawback to being rotational as opposed to a static Occupational Therapist?

There seems to be more rotational jobs available in my area over static jobs – is this the same for you? If so, why do you think this is?

What tips do you have for people who are looking for their first OT job and are unsure which route to go down?

If you took a rotational job, how many rotations did you complete before moving onto a static post?

References:

Polglase, T., Treseder, R. (2012) The Occupational Therapy Handbook: Practice Education. Keswick:M&K Publishing

Post Chat

Host: Kerri Schubert (@Kerri_schOT).

Support: Kelly  @otonthetracks

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript 26th Jan 2019

The Numbers

1.298M Impressions
489 Tweets
47 Participants
391 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 15th January 2019 – Applying your learning in Practice

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “applying your learning” and will be hosted by Sarah Lawson (@SLawsonOT).

Here is what Sarah had to say…

Hi, I am Sarah (@SLawsonOT), I am an Occupational Therapist, MPhil/PhD student, volunteer member of the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) North West Regional Committee and Conference Development Team and along with @HearleD we develop TRAMmCPD.

TRAMmCPD comprises of the TRAMm (Tell, Record, Apply, Monitor and measure) Model and its tools the TRAMm Tracker and TRAMm Trail, which collectively are known as TRAMmCPD. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is a personal and subjective journey, as well as our professional responsibility and a mandatory requirement of our registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). In order to be effective we need to Tell others, Record and Apply what we have learnt through our CPD activities, Monitor our progress and measure the impact (Hearle et al 2016). Information about TRAMmCPD and free downloads are available from our website (www.TRAMmCPD.com) and if you are a member of RCOT our book us available to view, free via the RCOT website.

Both Deb and I are carrying out Doctoral research into CPD and the TRAMmCPD and our findings have led to a more explicit focus within the TRAMm Model of the importance of the applicationof learning in practice. It is not enough to record that we have learnt something, and reflected but what we do next with what we have learnt is fundamental to meeting the HCPC Standards for CPD.

For the #RCOT2018 Conference with a little help from some friends and students we put together #CPDBingo with one game for before and during conference the other for after conference.

How do you Apply your learning?

The decision to attend a conference or training can involve a lot of planning. You have booked your place, negotiated time from work, arranged the funding, saved money for the trip, all your domestic arrangements are made. You attend the event, learn a lot and have a great time.

What next?

You have your certificates safely stored in the carrier bag under the bed… but will your Certificate/s of Attendance be just that or will it/they form a part of your wider engagement in your CPD?

You have engaged in a myriad of CPD activities, some formal others informal, you have a list if you need it in your diary.

You have learnt a range of new things, from talking and listening to colleagues, through social media, reading, listening to podcasts and a whole host of other every day activities.

How do these become part of your CPD?

Questions to Consider:

Q1: What types of activities have you learnt the most from this year?

Q2: If you were at #RCOT2018 in person, followed sessions on Twitter or read any of the blog squad posts what were your most significant learning points, and which have you applied in practice? If you did not attend #RCOT2018 what other events have you learnt the most from and which have changed your practice in some way?

Q3: How have you Applied what you have learnt to benefit yourself?

Q4: How have you Applied what you have learnt to benefit your service users?

Q5: How have you Applied what you have learnt to benefit your organisation?

Q6: What other types of Application of your learning have you done?

Post Chat

Host: @SLawsonOT

OTalk support: @kirstieot

Online Transcript

#otalk healthcare social media transcript january 15th 2019

he Numbers

1.656M Impressions
373 Tweets
34 Participants
298 Avg Tweets/Hour
11 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk – 8th January 2019 – ResOTlutions!

note notebook notes page

Hello and welcome to the 1st #OTalk of 2019, as requested by the community, the first chat of the year has become a regular resOTlutions chat. This not only gives us a good opportunity to have a nice relaxing chat to get us back into the swing of things after our Christmas and New Year break, but enables the community to share ideas of what they have planned for CPD in 2019 and/or ask the community for ideas if we are stuck for creative and interesting things to keep our CPD fresh.

With that in mind this weeks chat will be a informal relaxed discussion. But just to get you thinking we still have some questions to get things going…..

  1. How often do you review your CPD activities? Have you reviewed them recently?
  2. Do you have a strategic overview of your CPD activities?
  3. How do you decide you have covered a topic or need to cover a topic?
  4. What are your current CPD priorities?
  5. What CPD activities did you completed in 2018 that you really enjoyed? – This may give others some ideas of things to do.
  6. Do you have any topics that you feel you need to explore but don’t have a plan on how to do so yet? – Ask the community they may have some ideas to help you.

Please also feel free to ask questions and discuss anything you wish in relation to planning for your CPD and setting CPD goals.

Post Chat

Host and Otalk Support – @helenotuk

#otalk healthcare social media transcript january 8th 2019

Online Transcript

The Numbers

574.354KImpressions
131Tweets
20Participants
105Avg Tweets/Hour
7Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants