OTalk

#OTalk Tuesday 31st May 2022 – Getting the best out of a virtual conference.

Conference season is upon us once again, however not all conferences have returned to physical events, some adopting a hybrid model whilst others have retained the virtual model.

With such a range of offerings it can be difficult to decide which to attend? What offers the most value for money? Is travel and being away from home not possible? Is the conference only available virtually? Whatever the reason many people will be attending virtual conferences this coming year… and beyond.

To prepare us for this developing style of conference this chat will look to explore the communities’ experiences, garner resources and share ways we can “get the best out of virtual conferences”. As a UK based chat, many of the community may also be attending #RCOT2022 which is a fully virtual conference.

We thought an old school #OTalkTeaParty would be a good idea, so grab a slice of cake and a cuppa….. (other treats and drinks are permissible)

Some tips found on Twitter to get the thoughts flowing:

Do check out the replies to these tweets too.

Before we get to it, feel free to share you #OTalkTeaParty treats of choice.

Questions: (Subject to change if requested)

  1. Are you planning on attending any virtual conferences in 2022?
  2. How many virtual conferences have you attended before?
  3. What did you find most beneficial from attending a virtual conference?
  4. What did you find least beneficial form attending a virtual conference?
  5. What is your top tip for attending a virtual conference?
  6. Do you have any tools that you have found useful when attending a virtual conference?
  7. and finally…. do you have any further questions you would like posing to the chat?

We look forward to chatting all things virtual conference with the community…

If you have any questions you would like including do tweet us @OTalk_

POST CHAT

Host:  Helen @helenotuk

Support on OTalk Account: Rachel @OT_rach

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk – Tuesday 19th October 2021 -Assessing fatigue: capturing what counts?

This #OTalk is hosted by Dr Leisle Ezekiel

Fatigue is a common and distressing consequence of many neurological conditions and has long been an area of focus in occupational therapy, particularly for therapists working with people with progressive neurological conditions. But it is increasingly evident that fatigue is a significant problem for people living with acquired brain injury and is a distinct and direct consequence of brain injury. Estimates of prevalence vary from 21-77% and there is evidence that fatigue may last for many years (Wylie and Flashman 2017; Acciarresi, Bogousslavsky and Paciaroni, 2014; Headway, 2019).

Fatigue is a complex and subjective experience which is difficult to define as it overlaps with concepts of tiredness and with the symptoms of depression, sleep dysfunction and muscle weakness (Doncker et al 2018, Mollayeva et al 2014). It is therefore best thought of as multi- dimensional phenomenon that consists of different types of fatigue with varying signs and symptoms. Cantor et al (2014) conceptualise fatigue as encompassing “psychological, motivational, situational, physical, and activity-related components” and define it as a: 

“subjective awareness of a negative balance between available energy and the mental and physical requirements of activities” (Cantor et al 2014)pp491.

So to understand an individual’s experiences of fatigue, we need to consider fatigue in the context of people’s daily lives (including occupations and environments), the behaviour associated with fatigue (i.e. coping strategies) and their beliefs around fatigue and activity. However, it can be difficult to disentangle fatigue experiences from other consequences of brain injury. For example: is a lapse in concentration a sign of fatigue or do people tire more easily because they have difficulty with attention (Wylie and Flashman 2017)

There have been several attempts to develop a taxonomy or case definition of fatigue after stroke (Kluger et al 2013, Lynch et al 2007). Others suggest a need to consider in-the-moment experiences of fatigue (state fatigue) separately from the chronic experience of fatigue (trait fatigue) as state fatigue is more likely to be associated with fatigue-related behaviours, for example, the decision to do something or whether to stop and rest (GR. Wylie and Flashman 2017) State fatigue is measured using a numeric rating scale or visual analogue scale (e.g. 0-10, with 0 being no fatigue and 10 worst fatigue). 

This complexity of fatigue creates challenges when we start to assess and measure fatigue and is a challenge in the development of fatigue outcome measures. There is a myriad of fatigue scales and measures used within research but many of them were not developed for the ABI population and tend to conflate the consequences of ABI with fatigue symptoms.  They are also completed retrospectively and ask for a summation of experience and are less reliable for those with cognitive challenges. When using a fatigue scale we need to pay close attention to what the scale measures, is fatigue uni or multi-dimensional, does the scale capture severity, intensity or impact or a combination of these? 

As occupational therapists, we focus on enabling people to manage their fatigue effectively, so that they can participate in the daily activities that are most meaningful and necessary. To do that, we need to understand the individual’s triggers, patterns of, and responses to fatigue so we can support them in developing and applying effective strategies.  But our assessment of fatigue is shaped by our conceptualisation of fatigue and depends on the tools we use to gather accurate and meaningful information about fatigue.  A survey of physiotherapists and occupational therapists highlighted significant differences in therapist’s beliefs about fatigue, with potential for these differences to result in clients/patients receiving conflicting advice (Thomas et al 2019)

The questions for today are: 

  1. How do we as OTs conceptualise fatigue for people with neurological conditions?
  2. What tools are useful in gathering data about people’s fatigue?
  3. What challenges do we experience in practice when gathering information about fatigue?
  4. How do we know assess whether our intervention has made a positive impact? 

References

Cantor JB, Ashman T, Bushnik T, Cai X, Farrell-Carnahan L, Gumber S, Hart T, Rosenthal J and Dijkers MP (2014) Systematic review of interventions for fatigue after traumatic brain injury: A nidrr traumatic brain injury model systems study. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 490–497.

Doncker W de, Dantzer R, Ormstad H and Kuppuswamy A (2018) Mechanisms of poststroke fatigue. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 89(3): 287–293. Available at: https://jnnp.bmj.com/content/89/3/287 (accessed 06/08/21).

Kluger BM, Krupp LB and Enoka RM (2013) Fatigue and fatigability in neurologic illnesses: proposal for a unified taxonomy. Neurology. Neurology 80(4): 409–416. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23339207/ (accessed 06/08/21).

Lynch J, Mead G, Greig C, Young A, Lewis S and Sharpe M (2007) Fatigue after stroke: the development and evaluation of a case definition. Journal of psychosomatic research 63(5): 539–44. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17980228 (accessed 19/06/14).

Mollayeva T, Kendzerska T, Mollayeva S, Shapiro CM, Colantonio A and Cassidy JD (2014) A systematic review of fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury: The course, predictors and consequences. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. Elsevier Ltd 47: 684–716. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25451201 (accessed 23/12/14).

Thomas K, Hjalmarsson C, Mullis R and Mant J (2019) Conceptualising post-stroke fatigue: a cross-sectional survey of UK-based physiotherapists and occupational therapists. BMJ Open. British Medical Journal Publishing Group 9(12): e033066. Available at: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/12/e033066 (accessed 06/08/21).

Wylie GR and Flashman LA (2017) Understanding the interplay between mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive fatigue: models and treatments. Concussion. Future Medicine Ltd 2(4): CNC50. Available at: http://www.futuremedicine.com (accessed 13/05/21).

Wylie GR and Flashman LA (2017) Understanding the interplay between mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive fatigue: models and treatments. Concussion (London, England). Concussion 2(4): CNC50. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30202591/ (accessed 06/08/21).

POST CHAT 

Host:  Dr Leisle Ezekiel

Support on OTalk Account:  @helenotuk

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk Tuesday 22nd Sep 2021 -The Role of Occupational Therapy in Primary Care Mental Health Teams

This #OTalk is hosted by Helen Parmenter and Cheryl Carr who are both occupational therapists working in primary care teams.

Increasing complexity is one of the major factors responsible for the rising workload in general practice (Baird et al 2016) and involves patients presenting with two or more health conditions which also interact with other social difficulties such as poverty, trauma, isolation etc.
Often these difficulties are considered in isolation when people try and access services meaning patients often fall through the gaps between specialist mental health services, social care and Improving Access to Psychological therapies with their management being held by their local GP.

As part of the NHS long term plan, which NHS England published in 2019, local areas are being asked to realign community mental health services with primary care networks, creating ‘new and integrated models of primary and community mental health care’ by 2023/24 (NHS England 2019, p 69) resulting in the establishment of primary care networks (PCNs).

A diverse range of mental health needs are seen in primary care, with general practices supporting people with a wide range of diagnoses and complexities, including people with psychosis, bipolar disorder, personality disorders and other needs. (The Kings fund, 2020 )

Examples of population needs may include:

  • People with complex needs that do not fulfil criteria for specialist mental health services
  • Child and adolescent mental health needs that do not fulfil criteria for secondary care services
  • Mental health needs among older people
  • People with long-term mental health conditions discharged from secondary care
  • People with persistent physical symptoms which impact on their mental wellbeing
  • Psychological needs of people with long-term physical health conditions
  • People at risk of suicide, but not in contact with specialist mental health services

With the establishment of the PCNs, an increasing number of roles are emerging for occupational therapists to work within these newly established teams which often comprise of a mix of GPs, social prescribers, peers support workers, coaches, counsellors and psychological practitioners.

Within primary care mental health services occupational therapists are involved in activities such as
-Risks assessments for acute distress
-Personalised care planning for self-management
-Patient activation to achieve personal goals
-Social prescribing, and signposting or referral onto recovery support and services
(RCOT)

With services in their infancy and roles being developed in practice with opportunities to shape our own unique contribution, we look forward to hearing form the wider community about their thoughts about how occupational therapists can develop this opportunity to promote their skills to others, identify gaps, develop new ways of working and become imbedded as partners in their local communities.

Questions that will be discussed during this #OTalk are:

  1.  What help or support do you wish patients had in primary care mental health services?
  2.  What key skills can OTs utilise to be most effective in their roles?
  3.  How can OT’s be effective and timely with complex presentations?
  4.  What might be the best ways for OTs to demonstrate their outcomes to others both within the GP surgeries and beyond?

References;

Baird B, Charles A, Honeyman M, Maguire D, Das P (2016). Understanding pressures in general practice [online]. The King’s Fund website. Available at: http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/ pressures-in-general-practice (accessed on 21st July 2021).
The Kings Fund (2020). Mental Health and primary care networks: understanding the opportunities. The Kings Fund website. Available at: https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/mental-health-primary-care-networks (accessed 26th July 2021)

NHS England (2019). The NHS long term plan [online]. NHS England website. Available at: http://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan (accessed on 20 July 2021).

RCOT. Occupational therapy in primary care. RCOT website Available at: https://www.rcot.co.uk/occupational-therapy-primary-care (accessed 20 July 2021)

POST CHAT

Host:  Helen Parmenter and Cheryl Carr

Support on OTalk Account: @helenotuk

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.

The Stats

OTalk

#OTalk 15th Oct 2019 The Elizabeth Casson Trust launch of their International Scholarship award. 

This week the chat will be hosted by The Elizabeth Casson Trust who are proud to announce the launch of their International Scholarship award. 

Earlier this year, The Elizabeth Casson Trust launched their Conference Awards. These were designed to enable Occupational Therapists to attend an occupation focussed conference within the UK, either as part of their ongoing learning or in order to present their work.  So far, the conference awards have funded 40 individuals to attend national and international conferences. The feedback we have received from recipients has been very positive with great enthusiasm and ideas on what to take back to practice.

We are now launching our International Scholarship providing successful scholars an opportunity to reorient their careers and lift themselves to a higher professional level.

Our future plans also include the launch of an impact award. 

Aim of the Twitter chat

  • We aim to introduce these awards 
  • Give individuals a chance to explore ways in which the grants could be best used
  • Provide guidance on how to compile a successful application
  • Answer any questions.

Some questions to consider 

  • How could I use the opportunity?
  • What tips do you have for a successful application? 
  • What are the post scholarship expectations?
  • What other opportunities and future awards are the trust considering?
  • Is this opportunity for me?
  • What will the international scholarship funding cover?
  • What support will I have while I am away?
  • Which countries could I plan to visit on my itinerary?

POST CHAT

Host: ElizabethCassonTrust @ElizabethCasso1

On the OTalk account: @helenotuk

Online transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript October 15th 2019

The Numbers

1.090M Impressions
205 Tweets
37 Participants
91 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

OTalk

#OTalk Tuesday 20th August 2019. Do Occupational Therapist routinely assess clients menstrual cycle, it’s affect on functioning and ability to manage? engagement in occupations?

This weeks Rachel @OT_rach from OTalk is hosting the chat this is what she has to say,

I have recently listened to an audiobook call ‘Period Power’ by Melissa Hill.

The introduction starts with the following.
In my profession as a woman’s health specialist I get asked a lot of questions, questions that my clients have had since they were 13 that they still don’t have an answer for in their 30s. Questions that usually begin with why, such as

Why is my period so painful/short/light/long/heavy?
Why are they so frequent/irregular/rare?
Why have they stopped altogether?
Why do I feel so great one week and so bloody awful the next?
Why is my vagina sore dry/wet/sensitive?
Why does sex hurt sometimes/all the time?
Why don’t I want to have sex?
Why am I so horny?
Why am I so goddamn tired all the time?
Why do I get so bloated that my dress size jumps up two sizes?
Why do I feel anxious/stressed/depressed?
Why am I so full of rage.
The answer to all of these questions is it’s your hormones. ‘

In another chapter she goes on to describe.

Follicular Phase: Menstruation to Ovulation.
Your period and your cycle are a reflection of your overall health and can be affected by little and large life events. Those gallons of wine and platefuls of delicious stinky cheesy cheese you devoured over Christmas, the crazy work project that nearly broke you, the relationship issues that keep you up all night, the death of a loved one, weight gain or loss, travelling, finally quitting smoking, the supplements you been taking, the Yoga class you’ve been going to, the new job that you love, the great sex you’ve been having, – they all have an impact on whether your period is early or late, light or heavy, short or long and painful or pleasurable.

Period Power – Maisie Gill Greentree 2019

What struck me as I listen to this book was how a lot of what she described were occupations that we engage in, and it got me thinking, Do Occupational Therapists routinely assess clients menstrual cycle, it’s affect on functioning and ability to engage in occupations they need to or want to do?

As I listened I tweeted out some of my thinking, got some great responses and had some interesting discussions from the OT community. Including Katie Major @KatieCMajor, who kindly agree to co host this chat.

Below are some questions that I plan to ask during the chat on Tuesday to generate discussion.

Question 1) Do you routinely ask about, assess for or provide interventions relating to your clients menstrual cycle? If so please give examples.

Question 2) From your own experiences of having a menstrual cycle or from knowing someone that does, what impact does it have on engagement in occupations that you need to or want to do?

Question 3) What assessment tools could we use as occupational therapist to understand the impact a clients menstrual cycles may be having on their functioning?

Question 4) What are the possible interventions we could engage our clients in to enable them to manage the occupation of their dealing with their period?

Question 5) What are the possible interventions we could work on with clients to enable them to manage and understand the impact of the menstrual cycle on their ability to engage in occupations?

Loving forward to the chat, Rachel

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`POST CHAT

Host Rachel Booth @OT_rach

Support on OTalk about @helenotuk

Online transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript August 20th 2019

The Numbers

1.310M Impressions
523 Tweets
54 Participants
21 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants