#OTalk 21st August 2018 – Influencing Equipment Provision, It’s within our gift.

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Equipment Provision” and will be hosted by Adam Ferry (@AdamFerry3). This chat is one in a series of chats being hosted in collaboration with the OT Show (@TheOTshow).

Here is what Adam had to say…

The experience of equipment exhibitions for many Occupational Therapists working within the public sector (NHS/Local Authority) is likely to have been similar to my own.  The relatively undirected amblings of someone looking longingly at equipment they know will never be available to them.

That was certainly my experience some years ago until I dipped my toe into the private sector.  From that point exhibitions became a lot more interesting as I understood that my awareness and understanding of the market played a critical role in ensuring recommendations within that sector were current, accurate and exhaustive.

For this reason I can understand, based on my experiences, why manufactures/providers of healthcare products often appear to focus more on the private market and indeed why whilst making my way through exhibitions I hear Occupational Therapists saying to the exhibitor “sorry, I work in the NHS”.

However, working in both statutory and private services concurrently has afforded me opportunity to both expand my product knowledge and influence decision makers within the former.

At The OT Show 2017 I was shown a moving & handling product, a non-mechanised standing aid, very similar to a popular but more expensive model often used by my Occupational Therapy team.  The product we had been requisitioning in increasingly high numbers needed to be approved by a weekly clinical panel based on clinical reasoning and availability of reconditioned alternatives but was reducing significantly the need for mechanical standing hoists which were currently a standard stock item.  The approval process and subsequent ordering meant that clients were often waiting for 2-3 weeks for this piece of equipment with hospital discharges managed with alternatives that were not ideal.

On discussion with the exhibitor some recommendations were made for minor alterations to the product that would make it more flexible within the home environments we work in.  We discussed costs per unit and availability of stock.  Based on reduction of mechanical stand-aid provision and the lower cost of this new product I felt able to build a business case that suggested its inclusion as a standard stock item off-set by making the mechanical device a ‘special’ requiring panel approval.

This business case was approved, the equipment trialed and has now been ordered in bulk as a standard equipment store item.

My personal experience demonstrates how Occupational Therapists use of an exhibition is not dependent on which sector you work in but more about mind-set.  Wherever we work we are the expert in our clients and their needs.  Equipment providers need us to tell them what we need, so be brave and take control.

Exhibitors also need to take ownership; engage Occupational Therapists from every sector.  I may have ordered 1-12 of these products a year in my private sector role but have just influenced the order of more than 30.

Tell exhibitors what we need so that they can go and find or design it; that makes an exhibition a true collaboration of expertise.

So lets start a revolution and have the equipment our clients need on the approved list, not what is cheapest or what a non-clinical manager tells us we need.

Chat Objectives:

  • Participants will reflect on their potential impact on commissioning of equipment.
  • Acknowledge skills and demand for specialist knowledge within manufacturing & design.
  • Reflect on our use of exhibitions as a ‘2 way street’.
  • Develop an understanding of how we can influence change, both in design and procurement.

Questions to Consider:

  1. What do you want to get out of an OT conference exhibition?
  2. Is there a difference in mind set between private & statutory sector OTs within an exhibition?
  3. Have you had any experiences of influencing change to equipment procurement?
  4. What do you think that exhibitors want from us?
  5. Describe your perfect conference exhibition. How would it be different?

Keep your eyes peeled for some exciting news coming soon from The OTalk Team & The OT Show!

Post Chat

Chat host @AdamFerry3

On the #OTalk account @helenotuk

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript August 21st 2018

The Numbers

293.969K Impressions
148 Tweets
15 Participants
118 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

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#OTalk 8th May 2018 – Podcasts as a Tool for CPD

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Podcasts as a Tool for Continuing Professional Development” and will be hosted by Stephanie Lancaster (@TheOutLoudOT).

Stephanie Lancaster has practiced as an OT for over 25 years.  She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis. Stephanie blogs at www.stephanielancaster.com and hosts a podcast for people interested in OT called On The air (www.OnTheAir.us). She is currently pursuing a doctorate in education in the field of Instructional Design & Technology and is writing a dissertation on the impact of podcasting on the education and growth of occupational therapy students.

Here is what Stephanie had to say… A podcast is generally described as a series of digital audio files that can be accessed online and downloaded and listened to on an electronic device. The term podcast was coined in 2004 by British journalist Ben Hammersley through a combination of the words iPod and broadcast.  Since that time, podcast carriers such as iTunes have helped to propel this type of media file into popularity, with millions of downloads and live or on-demand daily across the globe. Podcasting has begun to be explored in formal education settings as an educational technology tool that has been used at an increased frequency in recent years for a variety of reasons. The range, flexibility, ease of use, accessibility, and affordability (most podcasts can be accessed for free) of podcasts make this medium a viable platform for learning not just for students but also for individuals seeking professional development, including occupational therapy practitioners. With a variety of learning opportunities available through listening to podcasts, this technology opens up options for learning about a wide variety of topics related to the practice of occupational therapy.

Questions for the OTalk Chat:

Q1: How often do you listen to podcasts?

Q2: What do you see as the benefits of listening to podcasts?

Q3: Do you feel that listening to podcasts helps you to learn and grow professionally?

Q4: How often you reflect on, think about, and/or talk about things you have heard on podcasts after you listen?

Q5: What podcast and/or podcast episode do you recommend that others in the field of OT listen to and why?

Post Chat

Chat Host: Stephanie Lancaster @TheOutLoudOT

On the #OTalk Account: @helenotuk

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript May 8th 2018

The Numbers

514.598K Impressions
219 Tweets
29 Participants
175 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants