#OTalk 20th November 2018 – Tweeting at Events, Conferences and Training.

This weeks #OTalk is about tweeting at conferences and other events and will be hosted by the OTalk Team.

Tweeting at real time events has many benefits; it gives promotion to the event, cause or Profession, allows you to share your views, it offers those not in attendance a chance to gain insight into the event and share in the learning opportunity and it can also be used as a reflective tool.

This chat aims to give you some hints and tips by finding out how those in the community share via Twitter, discuss what they feel helps their learning and highlight some common pitfalls and hurdles.

Some questions to consider;

Do you Tweet at events and why? If not, why not?

What are the positives? Whats your preferred way to share at events? What have you found most useful?

Are there any negatives? Perhaps you feel live tweeting detracts from the event? How do we overcome the barriers?

What are your “top tips”? Ours is don’t forget the hash tag!

Is there anything else that would encourage you to share more, to engage or to share differently?

If you are new to Tweeting, at conferences or in general, why not give it ago at this weeks OT Show? If you get stuck or have any questions you can stop by the #OTalk stand (we are J66) and we will be happy to support you! 

POST CHAT

HOST: @OTalk_

SUPPORT FROM OTalk: @gilliancrossley

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript November 20th 2018

Online transcript

The Numbers

2.155M Impressions
396 Tweets
79 Participants
16 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

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#OTalk 13th November 2018 – Maintaining an occupational focus with generic mental health roles

This weeks #Otalk is on the topic of “generic roles within mental health” and will be hosted by Abigail Matthews (@Abi21643842).

Here is what Abi had to say…

It is not uncommon for occupational therapists to find themselves within a generic health role, as therapists with a broad range of transferable skills therapists are ideally placed within this role.  The first occupational therapists to work in mental health provided meaningful occupations for injured soldiers during the First world war. Making use of arts, crafts and basket weaving activities (Pettigrew at al., 2017). In recent times the healthcare sector has developed additional roles for occupational therapists within generic roles, often community based (Lloyd at al., 2007). However, there are many challenges with the blurring of roles and professional boundaries. Evidence suggests that occupational therapists can find it difficult to maintain their occupation focussed within this type of role (Crawford at al., 2000). This OT talk will help explore practitioners experiences and understanding of how best to support professional development within a generic mental health setting.

  1. What are the benefits and challenges of working as an OT in a general mental health setting
  2. What mental health specific skills are necessary in this type of role?
  3. What resources and tools can support practitioners to remain occupation centred?
  4. What extra learning/ work based training has supported your practice?

References

Brown, B. , Crawford, P. and Darongkamas, J. (2000), Blurred roles and permeable boundaries: the experience of multidisciplinary working in community mental health. Health & Social Care in the Community, 8: 425-435. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2524.2000.00268.x

Lloyd, C., King, R. and Ryan, L., 2007. The challenge of working in mental health settings: Perceptions of newly graduated occupational therapists. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70(11), pp.460-470.

Pettigrew, J., Robinson, K. and Moloney, S., 2017. The bluebirds: World War I soldiers’ experiences of occupational therapy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(1), pp.7101100010p1-7101100010p9.

POST CHAT

Chat host: Abigail Matthews @Abi21643842

#OTalk Support: @gilliancrossley

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript November 13th 2018

Online Transcript

The Numbers

1.275M Impressions
277 Tweets
31 Participants
222 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

OTalk Participants

#OTalk 30th October 2018 – Bringing the OT community closer together, on and offline.

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Bringing the OT community closer together” and will be hosted by The OT Hub and the OT Show (@theOThub and @theOTshow). This chat is the final in a series being hosted in collaboration with the OT Show.

Here is what they had to say…

The OT Hub is the worldwide community for occupational therapy. It aims to bring the OT community closer together online, through information-sharing and a free membership. Offline, The OT Show (UK) provides an annual meeting space, networking opportunities and CPD for the profession. Both serve to enhance practitioner and student support.

Communities of practice (CoPs), such as The OT Hub and OT4OT, are professional communication forums, providing opportunities free of geographical constraint. Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002 p.4; cited by Hoffmann, Desha and Verrall, 2011) illustrate these as ‘groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area…’ In this case, the topic is occupational therapy. The OT Show is visited, in person, by the same passionate demographic.

But why connect both in person and online? Professional and geographic isolation are growing issues, as clinicians and students undertake roles in new, emerging and remote settings (Ezzamel, 2013; Ramsey, 2011). Communities of practice can assist in tackling isolation and in providing networking and mentoring opportunities (Bodell and Hook, 2014; Wiid et al., 2013; Hoffmann, Desha and Verrall, 2011). Similarly, profession-oriented events provide the chance to physically (re)connect with experienced and like-minded individuals, from across the globe. 

This #OTalk will explore the following themes in relation to bringing the occupational therapy community closer together:

  • Creating conditions for more collaborative innovation will be key to improved patient outcomes and future transformations (Innovation into Action, NHS England, 2015).
  • Professional and geographic isolation:
  • The more information available to the healthcare industry, the better able clinicians are to make the best decisions when supporting service users (Sood, 2017).
  • Public awareness of occupational therapy

Some questions to consider:

  1. How can shows and online platforms better support collaborative innovation and improved patient outcomes?
  2. What are your experiences of social isolation and how have you overcome them?
  3. Can problems arise (in study or in practice) from information overload?
  4. How can we work to become a profession that is better understood by the public and healthcare colleagues?

POST CHAT

Host: @theOThub and @theOTshow

OTalk Support: @gilliancrossley

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript October 30th 2018

The Numbers

270.128KImpressions
93Tweets
23Participants
74Avg Tweets/Hour
4Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants