#OTalk 19th May 2020 – Yr1: Thriving not Surviving

This week’s #OTalk is explores well-being in the first year of practice. It is being led by Andrew Bates (@AndrewbatesOT) and Deb May (DMay_OT) of the year 1: Thriving not Surviving project team.

The project is funded by the Elizabeth Casson Trust and aims to develop a resource to support well-being in the first year of practice. The team comprises newly qualified OTs working with OT Dr Lynne Goodacre and writer Rob Young.   More information about the project can be found here (https://www.lgpersonaldevelopment.co.uk/year-1/) and details about the team is found here.

We know that the first year of practice can be hard. You suddenly feel as though you don’t know enough about anything. You’re not sure how you will fit into the existing team. The previous band 5 in the rotation was so amazing you may never fill their shoes. You arrive with models of practice and theoretical approaches and find that the team you’ve joined doesn’t fit anything you’ve learned. Suddenly you have your own caseload and you sign your own notes – with nobody checking on you or countersigning them. You have responsibility. Your work life balance may be totally altered. You may have a long commute. You have money burning a hole in your pocket. There are so many things to juggle. It can be frightening. It’s challenging and rewarding and fun and it’s exactly what you’ve worked so hard for but some days it can be utterly overwhelming. On those days, where do you turn?

We would as many newly qualified occupational therapists as possible to join us for tonight’s talk to explore how you are managing your own well-being in your first year of practice and to help us develop the resources which would help future cohorts of newly qualified OT .

The questions we will be exploring include:

  1. What support was available for you as a newly qualified OT?
  2. What made the biggest difference to your well-being during your first year of practice?
  3. What actions did you take to maintain a state of well-being during your first year?
  4. What would have better improved your well-being during your first year?
  5. What piece of advice would you give to new graduates to support their well-being?

 

 

#OTalk 13th February – When we’re busy helping others how can we make time to look after ourselves?

This weeks #Otalk is on the topic of “occupational balance” and will be hosted byAmie Mowlam-Tett (@Amie_OT).

Here is what Amy had to say…

Personally, this topic is one close to my heart; during the second year of my MSc I experienced a number of personal setbacks, including the death of a close relative. At one time I couldn’t imagine myself qualifying, it took peer support and time to balance my occupations, remembering time for myself and I did it. I qualified. More importantly, I learnt a lot about balance and need for ‘me’ time. I want to share my experiences and get talking about the importance of our own health and wellbeing when so much of our times is focused on the health and wellbeing of others.

Wilson & Wilcock (2005) addressed the topic of occupational balance in student populations, finding time, money and stress to occupational imbalance and negatively affect wellbeing. Similarly, Clouston (2014) found Occupational Therapists often prioritised their workload and studying over leisure occupations negatively impacting on occupational balance and overall wellbeing.

With months to go before the end of the course for students, it’s easy to become focused on work and neglect time for yourself. I am asking you to take a break, breathe and think about your own wellbeing. Let’s talk about balance, what it means to us and come up with strategies to help keep that work-life balance healthy. This isn’t just for students, for clinicians, it’s a perfect opportunity to share your experiences, hints or advice and maybe pick up a few tips too.

Some questions to consider:

  1. What does occupational balance mean to you?
  2. How important is occupational balance in your daily life?
  3. How well balanced do you feel your occupations are? (eg work/studying and home-life)
  4. What most affect your occupational balance?
  5. How do you create occupational balance, what strategies do you use?
  6. What tips do you have for students about to qualify?
  7. If you could change one thing about your occupational balance what would it be?

References

Clouston TJ (2014) Whose occupational balance is it anyway? The challenge of neoliberal capitalism and work–life imbalance. British Journal of Occupational Therapy. 77 (10) 507–515.

Wilson L & Wilcock A (2005) Occupational Balance: What Tips the Scales for New Students? British Journal of Occupational Therapy. 68 (7) 319–323.

POST CHAT

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 13th 2018

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