#OTalk Research: Tuesday 6th February ‘The road less travelled? Supporting occupational therapists to conduct RCTs’

‘The road less travelled? Supporting occupational therapists to conduct RCTs’

This week’s OTalk Research is on the topic of conducting RCTs in occupational therapy and will be hosted by Avril Drummond (@AvrilDrummond1). Avril is Professor of Healthcare Research and Director of Research at the University of Nottingham, with a specialist interest in conducting randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

Here’s what Avril has to say ….

The term Evidence Based Practice (EBP) is used widely in both education and clinical practice. However, the reality is that evidence can mean slightly different things to specific groups who recognise different levels of quality; some advocate the traditional RCT evidence as the gold standard whereas others feel qualitative research is richer and more informative. However, although bodies who produce national clinical recommendations (such as NICE), are appreciating qualitative research much more than before, ultimately RCT evidence is the basis for many of their recommendations.

There are clear merits for using qualitative and quantitative methodologies and, increasingly, mixed methods. The bottom line is always what question is being answered. However, nonetheless, my impression is that OTs are more inclined to be involved in qualitative research (although I admit to having no hard evidence to back this up!). This might be for many reasons; a belief that the profession aligns itself more naturally with qualitative methodologies, more perceived difficulties in conducting RCTs and perhaps more bias in OT training towards ‘softer’ research. Yet generating RCT evidence is vital given that so many regard this as the gold standard – and fundamental to funding an intervention. Even results from small, underpowered RCTs can be used in meta-analysis to produce clear recommendations.

So the topic of this OTalk Research is RCTs. Here are some questions to consider:

  • Do you think OTs are more likely to do qualitative research? Why is this?
  • What is challenging for OTs about conducting RCTs?
  • What would make OTs more confident in conducting RCTs?
  • Has anyone been involved in an RCT? How did you get involved?
  • What would help more OTs to get involved in conducting RCTs?
  • What are the benefits of being involved – individually and for the profession?

Note that the topic title is the road less travelled (from the Robert Frost poem). The actual full line reads ‘Two roads diverged in a wood, and I- I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference.

POST CHAT

Online transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 6th 2018

The Numbers
3.518M Impressions
423 Tweets
54 Participants
338 Avg Tweets/Hour
8 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

Advertisements

#OTalk Research – Tuesday 5th December – Staying the course – maintaining momentum in research

December’s #OTalk Research is exploring maintaining momentum in research. It is being led by Tilly Greenwell (@Tilly_OT) with Emma Hooper (@hooper_ek) on the @OTalk_ account.

 

Intro Blog:

A requirement of my MSc Pre-Reg Occupational Therapy course was to undertake a major project for which I chose to do a small-scale quantitative research project. This experience, although challenging, was also exhilarating and led to me catching the research bug. I loved discovering findings that were not in previous papers and being able to present my results at COT16 so the results could be taken into consideration in others’ practice.

As a recently qualified occupational therapist, beginning a journey into the world of research is a daunting experience. There are many paths that can be taken to start this journey and trying to navigate the options can be overwhelming to say the least; this is what led me to attend a Research Coaching Programme at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) for allied health professionals (including @hooper_ek) and MMU lecturers from clinical backgrounds.

At the first event we were guided to explore alternative perspectives with regards to our research and given strategies to reflect on our current approaches to our academic endeavours. At the follow up event three months later, we discussed the specific difficulties the attendees were experiencing. We explored how the group members have sustained their enthusiasm and kept on track with their research when they were going through a particularly tough time. As one of the least experienced members of the group I found the answers helpful and motivating.

The last 6 months have felt like an emotional rollercoaster ride. There have been amazing highs, including being accepted for publication by the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and being offered a place on to the Professional Doctorate programme at Teesside University. However, there have also been mighty lows, as I could not enrol on the Doctorate due to circumstances out of my control. Since then, I have been finding it particularly difficult to sustain my drive and enthusiasm for research and this has led to a feeling of lacking direction. Through attending the research coaching programme I realised that I am not alone in these experiences, and that it can be difficult to stay the course and maintain momentum in research.

I hope this topic will be informative for you as we learn from each other’s experiences; helping to guide progression, overcome barriers and maintain momentum in our research adventures.

Questions to consider:

  1. At what points in the research process have you struggled to maintain momentum?
  2. What do you think caused this to happen?
  3. What or who helped you to get back in to the swing of things?
  4. What did it feel like to get back into the swing of things?
  5. What advice would you give to someone who has got bogged down with their research?
  6. What recent small achievement can you celebrate?

I am looking forward to discussing this topic with you all, thank you in advance for sharing your thoughts.

POST CHAT

online transcript

The Numbers

1.467M Impressions
396 Tweets
37 Participants
317 Avg Tweets/Hour

#OTalk Participants


11Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Research – Tuesday 5th September – Engaging occupational therapists in and with research

September’s #OTalk will feed into the Research and Development Review being undertaken by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists with the particular aim of considering how we encourage qualified occupational therapists to engage in and with research to boost the professions’ capacity for research.

The chat will be co-hosted by @TheRCOT and @JoWatson22. It will be supported by @preston_jenny from the #OTalk Research team.

Continue reading

#OTalk Research – Tuesday 1st August 2017. Looking back.

August’s #OTalk Research is looking back over the first year of dedicated monthly chats and is being hosted by Nikki Daniels – @NikkiDanielsOT (#OTalk Research Team) and supported by Helen – @Helen_OTUK  (#OTalk Team).

Intro Blog Post:

As we fast approach the first anniversary of #OTalk Research, we look back on a successful year of chats covering a range of research related topics. Discussions to date have demonstrated the strong interest in research within the profession, both across clinical areas and spanning various levels of experience of research activity.  Motivation and passion to engage in research and advance evidence base practice within the profession has never been so apparent.

#OTalk Research appears to be inspiring us to take part in studies, engage with academic peers or take the plunge in to a higher degree (or at least begin to think it could be a realistic possibility!)

Augusts #OTalk Research will see us open up the floor to you to share your reflections or actions, ask a question which may not yet have been answered or reach out to others with similar research interests. Whether you are a regular contributor, lurker or new to #Otalk Research this is an opportunity to reflect, take stock and forward plan both for our profession and move individual research aspirations forward!

So the #OTalk Research team would like to know about :

Q.1 What you have valued most about #OTalk Research?

Q.2 Any unanswered questions you still have around research in general?

Q.3 What hah you like to celebrate about OT research?

Q.4 What are your ideas for strengthening/building the OT research community?

Q.5 About anything you’ve been inspired to do from engaging with #OTalk research – no matter how big or small!

Q.6 Your top research tip you’d like to share

Q.7 Any topics you would like to see covered over the next 12 months?

Post Chat

online transcript

The Numbers

870.783K Impressions
269 Tweets
27 Participants
215 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants