#OTalk Research: 2nd June 2020 – ‘That’s interesting’ – communicating your research with a non-research audience.

Hosts: Camilla Long and Sarah Travers, Bespoke Communications

GuidedByTheScience has become an unofficial mantra as governments worldwide adopt measures to combat the #Covid19 pandemic. Robust scientific advice relies on objective, rigorous research. And as the pandemic has highlighted, it’s often people outside your specialist field who have the power to amplify your research outcomes. That can lead to a friction between accessibility and clarity – the age-old ‘dumbing down’ conundrum.

Let’s for a moment imagine pre-Covid times – you’re at a family event. Or that you’re striking up a conversation with the person beside you on a flight home from a conference. Or maybe you’re meeting an old schoolfriend for the first time in years. In response to the question, ‘ so what do you work at?’, you reply that you’re in research. There’s an encouraging nod and a lull in the conversation waiting for you to elaborate. You describe your research. There’s a brief pause. Then the person who asked the question looks at you, says ‘that’s interesting’ in a tone of voice that means anything but, and the conversation continues as though you never spoke at all.


This may have never happened to you! But making your research understood by your family and friends is a great first step in research communication. Your research is intertwined with the needs of other stakeholders in your discipline – be they patients, funders or other healthcare professionals. Communicating your research is about making it relevant to those general audiences, audiences who are made up of people with family, friends and lives outside their workplace just like you. Connecting with people and their needs is the first step in great research communication.
Effective communication opens opportunity for collaboration, consultation and inspiration. You’ve already done this without thinking about it – that time you recruited participants for a study, or the public consultation you ran to assess views and attitudes. What about your blog post or video that got shared by an influential clinician? Or the time you gave a talk in a local school that ended up connecting you with an important local support group? Well planned research communication leads to research outcomes that are more robust, build trust and have greater impact. In other words, great communication moves the response to your research from ‘that’s interesting’ to ‘wow, tell me more, that’s exactly what we need’.
But we’re all busy. And we don’t have time to spend on non-core activities. So, to help you to communicate for maximum impact, here are some questions for you to consider for this week’s #OTalk:

  1. Does your Research Institute value public engagement?
  2. How has communication with non-research stakeholders helped you?
  3. What’s the biggest challenge for you in communicating your research with a general audience?
  4. What public engagement communication activity have your personally undertaken – written articles and blog posts, videos on social media, presentations and talks, media interviews, other activity?
  5. What’s been the most worthwhile research communication activity that you’ve been involved in and why?
  6. After tonight’s #OTalk, what will you do differently when communicating with a non-academic audience?

Bespoke Communications (@bespoke_comms) is a leading people-development agency, specialising in communication – public speaking coaching, presentation skills, internal communications and media training. We help technical experts and researchers to access stakeholders with coaching for pitches, presentations, interviews and events.

#OTalk (Research), 2nd July 2019 Testing out the new draft RCOT Research and Development Strategy

#OTalk (Research), 2nd July 2019
Testing out the new draft RCOT Research and Development Strategy

This week’s #OTalk is the latest hosted by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) as part of its Research and Development Review, which is now drawing to a conclusion. The Review has provided the opportunity to engage with a range of constituent groups within RCOT’s membership, and to consider how the organisation supports the building of research capacity within the profession and the expansion of the evidence base informing practice. The primary output of the Review is a new RCOT Research and Development Strategy, the draft of which is the focus of this week’s #OTalk.

The chat will be co-hosted by @TheRCOT and @JoWatson22

The RCOT Research and Development (R&D) Review was launched in June 2017. Since then, we have held a series of listening events and consultations around the four nations of the UK and with a wide variety of occupational therapists including: practice-based staff, academics, researchers, service managers, consultant occupational therapists, post-graduate research students, specialist section R&D leads, members of the Council of Occupational Therapy Education Directors (COTED), occupational therapy professors and RCOT staff. We have consulted the literature and related policies across the four nations, reviewed the strategies of similar organisations and undertaken a number of focused projects including: a review of the RCOT Annual Awards, a review of the UK Occupational Therapy Research Foundation, and desk-based research scoping the research knowledge and skills related content of pre-registration education programmes accredited by RCOT.

Approximately 18 months’ work is now culminating in the drafting of the new RCOT Research and Development Strategy 2019-2024, which we anticipate will be published in early autumn 2019. As part of the process of consulting on and testing out the draft strategy, we are sharing key elements with you that we’d like to chat with you about during the #OTalk scheduled for July 2nd 2019.

You can access a summary of the core elements of the draft Research and Development Strategy here: https://www.rcot.co.uk/summary-draft-rcot-research-and-development-strategy-2019-2024

The questions forming the basis of the #OTalk discussion are:

1. Does the direction of travel set out in the draft R&D Strategy seem appropriate? If not, please try to explain why you think that is.

2. Bearing in mind the principle that we can all contribute something small to a larger collective effort, how does the draft R&D Strategy feel for you, in your circumstances?

3. How do you see yourself responding to the strategy? What actions do you think you could take?

4. Is there anything missing that you might have expected to see in draft R&D Strategy?

We are really looking forward to hearing your thoughts which will be very welcome contributions to the development of the new RCOT R&D Strategy.

Thank you.

POST CHAT

Host: Royal College of Occupational Therapists @TheRCOT and @JoWatson22

OTalk support: @LynneGoodacre

Online Transcript#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript July 2nd 2019

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript July 2nd 2019

The Numbers

1.395M Impressions
315 Tweets
27 Participants
164 Avg Tweets/Hour
12 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 6th November 2018 – Apps and Smart Technology in Research.

This week’s #OTalk Research is on the topic of “Apps and smart technology in research” and will be hosted by Leisle Ezekiel (@lezeki).

Here is what Leisle had to say………

Apps, smartphones, smartwatches and tablets are now part of everyday life for many people in the UK. Over 90% of people aged between 16 and 55 own a smartphone (Statista 2018) and whilst in the over 65s that percentage drops to 40%, it is increasing dramatically year on year (Ofcom 2018). 

As a novice occupational therapy researcher and an early adopter of technology, I was convinced by the potential of apps both in research and in occupational therapy practice. 

Apps and smartphones enable self tracking of a wide range of  behaviours and experiences  and are potentially less intrusive than more traditional methods. As well as capturing “in the moment experiences”, apps could deliver “in the moment interventions” and be of benefit to therapists in their assessment and intervention planning.  It is unsurprising then that there is an increasing interest in the use of apps within research, both as a method of collecting data and as a way of delivering interventions. 

For occupational therapists and the wider health arena, the use of apps and associated technology is a new landscape where health research overlaps with the world of app development. My personal experience of using apps in research has highlighted benefits as well as developing understanding of the potential ethical and practical challenges which can present, above and beyond those of more traditional research methods.

This week’s #OTalk will consider the following questions:

  1. What role do you think apps and smart technology can play in occupational therapy research?
  2. What do you consider to be the benefits of using apps and smart technology in occupational therapy research?
  3. What do you consider the barriers or risks of using apps and smart technology in research?
  4. What ethical considerations do we need to be aware of and overcome to use this technology in research?
  5. How can we improve and/or advance the use of apps and technology in occupational therapy research?

References.

Ofcom (2017) Rise of social seniors revealed. Accessed on 15.10.18 at https://www.ofcom.org.uk/about-ofcom/latest/media/media-releases/2017/rise-social-seniors

Statista (2018) UK: smartphone ownership by age from 2012-2018. Accessed on 15.10.18 at https://www.statista.com/statistics/271851/smartphone-owners-in-the-united-kingdom-uk-by-age/

POST CHAT

Host: Leisle Ezekiel @lezeki

OTalk Support: @NikkiDanielsOT

Online Transcript #OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript November 6th 2018

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript November 6th 2018

The Numbers

1.215M Impressions
276 Tweets
29 Participants
221 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant
#OTalk Participants

 

 

#OTalk Research 2nd October 2018 –Photo Elicitation 

This weeks #OTalk Research is on the topic of “Photo Elicitation” and will be hosted by Gemma Wells (@GemmaOTPHD).

Here is what Gemma had to say…

When completing my PhD I choose to use the visual research method of photo-elicitation.  Visual research methods draw on a range of materials which may include photographs, video, film and drawings (Flick 2009; Asaba et al 2015) although the most commonly used visual stimuli is that of photographs (Rose 2014).  

Photo-elicitation is a particular style of interviewing that requires participants to take photographs as part of the interview process (Collier 1957) and was originally borne from anthropologists using photographs to illustrate their work (Collier 1957; Ketelle 2010). The term ‘photo-elicitation’ was first used by Collier in 1957 as a result of an experiment that he completed which compared using photographs in interviews to traditional interviews which only drew upon verbal stimuli to generate discussion. He concluded that the interviews which used photographs to stimulate the discussions were more fruitful than those adopting the more traditional approach.

Following my use of this research method in my PhD I concluded that photo-elicitation has the potential to enable occupational therapists to gain an enhanced understanding of the people they work with as occupational beings.  This includes the ability to capture detailed information about the context that enables an activity to become an occupation. Participant led photo-elicitation reflects the person centred ethos of occupational therapy by enabling people to capture and discuss what is important to them.

This #OTalk will consider the following questions;

  1. What do you consider to be the benefits of using photo-elicitation in occupational therapy research?
  2. What do you think might be the challenges of using photo-elicitation in occupational therapy research?
  3. How do you think that the process of photo-elicitation could be used in occupational therapy practice?
  4. What factors do you think need to be considered when using photo-elicitation in practice?
  5. How might photo-elicitation be used in your research or practice?

POST Chat

Host: @GemmaOTPHD

On the OTalk account: @preston_jenny

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript October 2nd 2018

The Numbers

1.283M Impressions
216 Tweets
15 Participants
173 Avg Tweets/Hour
14 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 4th September 2018 – Creating a vibrant occupational therapy research community – the way forward?

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Creating a vibrant occupational therapy research community” and will be hosted by The Royal College of Occupational Therapists and Gillian Ward (@TheRCOT and @DrGillianWard).

This is the second chat hosted by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists.  The aim is to feed into the Research and Development Review being undertaken to create a new RCOT vision, strategy and action plan for research and development that is fit to guide the profession’s progress and direction of travel over the next 10 years.

The Review was launched in June 2017 and over the last year there has been a series of listening events and consultations across the country, including all 4 nations, with a wide variety of occupational therapists including; clinical staff, academics, researchers, service managers, consultant occupational therapists, post-graduate research students, specialist section R&D leads and RCOT staff.

RCOThave heard a lot about barriers and obstacles to engaging in and with research and are keen to turn this around to focus on what is working for folk; what are the small (or large) changes that have gained traction and moved things beyond ‘problem’ towards ‘solution’. One of the key themes emerging from the R&D Review and a discussion point with several contributors was a real need to invest in building the occupational therapy research community and network, with the Royal College taking a strong lead in doing this for the profession. Currently, there is no opportunity for occupational therapy researchers to come together to develop a community of practice to share their passion for research and learn how to do it better.

This is where we need your help, and that’s what we’d like to chat with you about during tonight’s #OTalk.  The questions forming the basis of our discussion are:

  1. What are the important ingredients in creating and sustaining a vibrant research culture?
  2. What networks and collaborations are important to cultivate to underpin and facilitate a culture of research?
  3. Thinking on a national level, what would a vibrant research community look like and feel like to be part of?
  4. How can RCOT help to build the occupational therapy research community and network (making no promisesJ)?
  5. What are the most effective ways to capture and evaluate the impact of an emerging research community?

We are really looking forward to hearing your thoughts and ideas, which will be a very welcome contribution to the development of the R&D Strategy. If you get a chance ahead of the #OTalk session, it would be really helpful if you could give some thought to the ingredients that create a good environment to support occupational therapists’ engagement in and with research and how we could develop the occupational therapy research community.

We’d really love to hear all of the creative ideas that you can come up with as we move into the development phase of the RCOT R&D Strategy.

POST CHAT

Chat host:  The Royal College of Occupational Therapists and Gillian Ward (@TheRCOT and @DrGillianWard).

On the @OTalk Account:

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript September 4th 2018

The Numbers

1.395M Impressions
450 Tweets
34 Participants
360 Avg Tweets/Hour
13 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants