OTalk

#OTalk – Tuesday 24th May 2022 – World Schizophrenia Day: How You Can Spread Awareness

This #OTalk is hosted by Ruth Hawley

24th May is World Schizophrenia Day.

Psychosis and schizophrenia are mental health problems that affect how a person thinks, feels and behaves. They can make it hard for the person to think clearly and tell the difference between what’s real and what’s not. The person may act differently or lose interest in things and other people.

The main symptoms are called ‘psychotic’ symptoms. These are:

  • hearing voices and sometimes seeing things that are not really there (called a hallucination)
  • believing that something is real or true when it is not (called a delusion); such as, believing they are being watched or having their thoughts monitored.

NICE (2014) defines psychosis and schizophrenia as a major psychiatric disorder (or cluster of disorders) that alters a person’s perception, thoughts, mood and behaviour recognising that each person will have a unique combination of symptoms and experiences.

Schizophrenia Awareness Day is practiced on a global scale to break down the stigma and prejudice that affect individuals with these experiences.

Questions that will be discussed during the #OTalk are:

1. What’s your awareness of schizophrenia/ psychosis? And where has this come from?

2. Can you share any good educational resources that you aware of in relation to schizophrenia or psychosis?

3. Do you think people with schizophrenia/ psychosis experience any stigma?  Does choice of language used influence this?

4. How could you/ have you challenged stigma about schizophrenia/ psychosis?

5. What role do you think social media plays or could play in awareness around schizophrenia/psychosis?

NICE (2014) Psychosis and schizophrenia in adults: prevention and management.  Available at: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg178/resources/psychosis-and-schizophrenia-in-adults-prevention-and-management-pdf-35109758952133 (Accessed 20th April 2022)

OTalk

#OTalk – Tuesday 17th May 2022 – Stabilising the flaky bridge of transition for newly qualified professionals

Tonight’s #OTalk will be hosted by:

Dr Lisa Taylor (@drlisataylor) – Associate Professor in Occupational Therapy School of Health Sciences and Associate Dean in Employability Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of East Anglia Norwich. Lisa has a passion for employability with student transitions being a key part of UEA’s employability strategy.

Ruth Laws (@ruth_laws)– recent MSc preregistration graduate from UEA – now working as a band 5 occupational therapist within Suffolk. Whilst at UEA Ruth completed her MSc dissertation on student transitions, supervised by Lisa. Ruth has presented her work at an international conference, and then completed her elective placement with the Health Education England (HEE) Reducing Pre-registration Attrition and Improving Retention (RePAIR) team, having developed a keen interest in the transition from student to newly qualified practitioner.

Lisa and Ruth have a shared interest and passion in graduate transitions and how to make the flaky bridge of transition more stable!

The transition from student to newly qualified professional can be challenging, and is a period reported and explored withing the HEE RePAIR project, being described as the flaky bridge. In recognition of the difficulties newly qualified occupational therapists (NQOTs) face, the Elizabeth Casson Trust funded the project Year 1: Thriving not Surviving to develop a series of resources to support NQOTs. Preceptorship programmes have also been developed by many organisations with the aim to support graduates in their transitions. However, as Ruth found out in her dissertation, these programmes can have a dual impact. The programmes can provide both positive and negative contributions to the transition from student to NQOT, including aiding professional development and fostering a supported, structured environment, but also being confusing, complicated, frustrating, and stressful.

We would like to use our #OTalk to explore the experiences of the flaky bridge from all perspectives tonight for a rich discussion. We would love contributions from all health and social care professions, including students, HEI academics, careers and employability staff, recent graduates, clinicians, employers and statutory bodies and policy makers. We have put together a series of questions to capture the main considerations, offering insights as to how we can help stabilise the transition from student to graduate health care professional. We hope that you will join in this important conversation.

  1. What do students, higher education institutes and employers need to know and be prepared for, to aid graduate transition into the workplace?
  2. Based on your experiences, what resources, support, and advice has helped graduates transition into the workplace?
  3. How could placement-based learning experiences better prepare students for the transition into the workplace?
  4. What experiences do you have of preceptorship? How can this experience be maximised for all involved?
  5. How could an online peer assisted cross-professional support network/community for new graduates work in conjunction with the more formal individual preceptor packages?

Relevant resources

POST CHAT

Host:  Dr Lisa Taylor (@drlisataylor) Ruth Laws (@ruth_laws)

Support on OTalk Account: Sam Pywell (@smileyfacehalo)

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

OTalk 10th May 2022 – The impact of Covid 19 on Occupational Balance. Hosted by @SharonOTUClan

This chat will be hosted by Sharon Hardman (@SharonOTUClan) 

The global Coronavirus pandemic, starting March 2020, had significant impacts on pre-registration Occupational Therapy (OT) students.  OT literature highlighted that occupational balance is an important concept in OT professional training.  Despite this, there is a paucity of research exploring occupational balance in pre-registration OT students.  As part of my research module I conducted primary research on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the occupational balance of MSc and BSc pre registration students in England.  The purpose of this research was to address the gap in the literature by exploring the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic on the occupational balance of undergraduate and post graduate pre-registration OT students in England. 

Key findings of this research were: 

●Occupational Therapy students had mixed experience of occupational balance during the Covid-19 pandemic, with online learning improving occupational balance. 

● Occupational deprivation experiences in Covid-19 Pandemic consolidated learning on occupational balance concepts and provided valuable insights in the ability to relate to clients for Occupational Therapy students.

● Occupational Therapy students recognised their identity was conjoined with occupations.  Identity was classified as the same during the Covid- 19 Pandemic, even when Occupational Therapy students were not actively participating in meaningful occupations.

Fundamental connections between lived experience of the Covid-19 pandemic and skills as an OT were shown as the crucial missing piece of the puzzle in occupational balance concepts, not evident in the literature.

I wanted to create an #OTalk that disseminated my findings and promoted further discussion in this area.

The questions that I would like you to consider are:

  1. Despite the long history of occupational balance, Wagman et al. (2012) found it remains an abstract and evolving concept that can be misunderstood compared to more concrete and observable OT theories.  What is your understanding of occupational balance?
  1. What matters to you in meaningful occupation?
  1. What was your experience of occupational balance during the Covid-19 pandemic?
  1. What strategies do you use to address occupational balance?
  1. How did being on placement/working during the Covid-19 pandemic influence your professional development?

Post Chat

Host:  Sharon Hardman (@SharonOTUClan)

Support on OTalk Account: @PaulWilkinson94

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk Research Chat- Tuesday 3rd May 2022 – Using Social Media to Share and Engage with Research

Have you been trying to figure out how to share your research with the people who can actually put the information into practice?

Are you an OT that wants to support research or find research that applies to your current caseload?

This week’s #OTalk, supported by @SamOTantha, is hosted by Katie Caspero (@otgraphically), Founder of OT Graphically, Infographic Creator, and Occupational Therapist. Katie helps healthcare professionals stay up to date by taking research and putting it into easy to read graphics. This helps therapists and their clients to understand and implement what the evidence says.

Katie will use her experience of using infographics and social media to help us to think about sharing and accessing research using social media platforms. 

Questions

  1. What social media platforms or formats have you found the most useful for sharing research with stakeholders and/or accessing research as a research consumer?
  2. In what ways have you found that social media has supported sharing, finding, and/or using research?
  3. As a researcher, what is the most helpful way for you to share your research and make it accessible for a wide audience through social media? As a research user what have you found helpful in making research accessible?
  4. Have you faced any challenges or barriers in using social media to access or share research?
  5. What are your top tips as a researcher or as a research user to engage with research via social media to both share and stay up to date?

Post Chat

Host:  Katie Caspero (@otgraphically), Founder of OT Graphically

Support on OTalk Account: @SamOTantha,

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk 26th April 2022 – Outcome Measures used by occupational therapists in forensic and justice-based settings.

This #OTalk based on outcome measures is hosted by Charlotte Wise (@charlee_w), occupational therapist working in a female prison.  I am keen to develop the role of occupational therapy in the prison environment and recognise the positive impacts of occupational therapy can offer to these marginalised service users.

It is recommended that occupational therapists should be measuring and recording outcomes of interventions conducted with service users to provide evidence of the effectiveness of work which we are completing.  By evidencing intervention effectiveness, occupational therapists can assist with service development and clinical audits.

In conversations with peers, it is evident that finding standardised outcome measures to use can be difficult, especially in forensic or justice services. Outcome measures are then sporadically used meaning there is minimal evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy in the different service areas.

I am keen to use #OTalk to discuss with a variety of different professionals, what outcome measures are being used, the process of selecting and using outcome measures, the benefits of standardised and non-standardised outcomes and how helpful they are in measuring quality or effectiveness of intervention

References

College of Occupational Therapists (2015) Measuring Outcomes. Accessed online on 16th April 2022 at Research-Briefing-Measuring-Outcomes-Nov2015.pdf (rcot.co.uk)

Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (2019) Outcome Measures Checklist.  Accessed online on 16th April 2022 at selecting-outcome-measures.pdf (rcslt.org)

Questions

  1. Introduction – areas of practice are individuals currently working? In practice, are you currently using outcome measures to measure effectiveness of interventions?
  2. What is your understanding of an outcome measure?
  3. In practice, what outcome measures are being used? Are they occupational therapy specific?
  4. What are the barriers of using outcome measures in practice?
  5. What can be done to make the outcome measures more accessible, user friendly, useable in practice?

POST CHAT

Host:  Charlotte Wise (@charlee_w)

Support on OTalk Account: Sam @smileyfacehalo

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.