OTalk

OTalk 10th May 2022 – The impact of Covid 19 on Occupational Balance. Hosted by @SharonOTUClan

This chat will be hosted by Sharon Hardman (@SharonOTUClan) 

The global Coronavirus pandemic, starting March 2020, had significant impacts on pre-registration Occupational Therapy (OT) students.  OT literature highlighted that occupational balance is an important concept in OT professional training.  Despite this, there is a paucity of research exploring occupational balance in pre-registration OT students.  As part of my research module I conducted primary research on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the occupational balance of MSc and BSc pre registration students in England.  The purpose of this research was to address the gap in the literature by exploring the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic on the occupational balance of undergraduate and post graduate pre-registration OT students in England. 

Key findings of this research were: 

●Occupational Therapy students had mixed experience of occupational balance during the Covid-19 pandemic, with online learning improving occupational balance. 

● Occupational deprivation experiences in Covid-19 Pandemic consolidated learning on occupational balance concepts and provided valuable insights in the ability to relate to clients for Occupational Therapy students.

● Occupational Therapy students recognised their identity was conjoined with occupations.  Identity was classified as the same during the Covid- 19 Pandemic, even when Occupational Therapy students were not actively participating in meaningful occupations.

Fundamental connections between lived experience of the Covid-19 pandemic and skills as an OT were shown as the crucial missing piece of the puzzle in occupational balance concepts, not evident in the literature.

I wanted to create an #OTalk that disseminated my findings and promoted further discussion in this area.

The questions that I would like you to consider are:

  1. Despite the long history of occupational balance, Wagman et al. (2012) found it remains an abstract and evolving concept that can be misunderstood compared to more concrete and observable OT theories.  What is your understanding of occupational balance?
  1. What matters to you in meaningful occupation?
  1. What was your experience of occupational balance during the Covid-19 pandemic?
  1. What strategies do you use to address occupational balance?
  1. How did being on placement/working during the Covid-19 pandemic influence your professional development?

Post Chat

Host:  Sharon Hardman (@SharonOTUClan)

Support on OTalk Account: @PaulWilkinson94

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk 12th April 2022 Intersectionality: What is it and why should occupational therapists know about it?  Hosted by @AbleOTUK

This week @AbleOTUK will be hosting the chat 

Intersectionality, n.

The interconnected nature of social categorisations such as race, class, and gender, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage; a theoretical approach based on such a premise.’

(Oxford Dictionary)

Kimberle Crenshaw a law professor and social theorist, first coined the word intersectionality in her 1989 paper “Demarginalising The Intersection Of Race And Sex: A Black Feminist Critique Of Anti-discrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory And Antiracist Politics.” to describe the dialogue between feminism and women of colour, highlighting the different barriers women face dependent on the colour of their skin. This movement called for better inclusion and understanding of the different issues, such as racism, women of colour face in seeking gender equality.  

Since then, the term intersectionality has broadened to include protected characteristics, such as class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability and gender.

Intersectional theory describes multiple overlapping identities such as, language, occupation, level of education, income, marital status, whether you are a parent or not. That may oppress a person or a group of people. It believes that markers of identity, like race or sexuality, don’t just exist separately, but they all overlap or interconnect when it comes to oppression and power. It’s the idea that these layers do not exist separately from each other but intersect to form a person’s identity, and can magnify the discrimination and marginalisation they might experience.

Intersectionality happens in society any time a person has multiple forces of discrimination working against them.

Gender and Disability in Healthcare example.

Jane has had problems with attention her whole life. Although she has been to see many doctors and other health professionals throughout her life. It was not until Jane was an adult that she was finally diagnosed with ADHD. However, her doctor wonders why she wasn’t diagnosed sooner.

ADHD is a well-known disability. However, there is little research into this disability for women. This is because, for a long time, it was thought to only impact on males. Therefore, the symptoms and diagnosis of the disease were written for men. 

Since there is little research on ADHD for women, diagnosis doesn’t usually happen until they are older. Therefore, a woman with ADHD might feel unique oppression in healthcare.

Question 1-  To what extent are you aware of the term Intersectionality, and what does it mean to you?

Question 2 – If you feel comfortable please share your intersectionality identity, in terms of class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability and gender, and any other factors that make up your Identity.

Question 3 – What if any discrimination of identity have you observed within services you have accessed or work/ed within?

Question 4 – Can you explain why understanding intersectionality is important within occupational therapy?

Question 5 – How might occupational therapy practice ensure it considers a person’s intersectionality?


References 

https://www.researchinpractice.org.uk/all/news-views/2021/september/why-intersectionality-is-vital-to-anti-discriminatory-practice/

https://time.com/5560575/intersectionality-theory/

https://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/intersectionalities

POST CHAT

Host:  @AbleOTUK

Support on OTalk Account: Helen @helen_otuk

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.

OTalk

#OTalk Research Tuesday 5th April 2022 – Career Progression in Occupational Therapy: To PhD or Not to PhD?

This weeks #OTalk research, will be hosted by the two newest members of the OTalk research team; Beverley Turtle (@bevaturtle) and Samantha Tavender (@SamOTantha).  

Beverley is a post-doctoral researcher based at Ulster University. She is part of a team of occupational therapists working across Northern Ireland and Ireland on a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of mirror therapy for the treatment of upper limb impairment following stroke. With a background in Psychology, Beverley graduated from Occupational Therapy in 2016, moving directly into a full time PhD, working part-time clinically as a band 5 occupational therapist alongside her role as a researcher.  

Samantha is a lecturer at the University of Huddersfield.  Before working as a lecturer Samantha has been working clinically as an Occupational Therapist for the last 10 years both in the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Samantha is at the very beginning stage of a part time PhD which is due to start September 2022. 

Beverley and Samantha are in contrasting stages of their careers, both in their research and clinical pathways. What they do have in common is that they have both chosen a PhD as an opportunity to develop their research skills and knowledge and to support them to progress along their chosen career pathways. 

Recognising the differences in their approaches to their chosen study patterns and timings within their careers has led Beverley and Samantha to reflect on the different approaches occupational therapists can take to develop their research skills, knowledge and ways of thinking to a level which is considered advanced (Royal College of Occupational Therapy 2021).  Their reflection has also considered if a PhD is the best or only way to progress research to this level within an occupational therapy career. What other ways could an individual progress their research skills, knowledge and ways of thinking to a level which is considered advanced without completing a formal doctoral qualification?

Join Samantha and Beverley as they reflect upon their individual journeys and join them with your own reflections and thoughts on developing as a researcher. 

Tonight’s chat questions:

  1. Let’s start by sharing our own stories and experiences. What opportunities have you taken to develop and advance your research skills and knowledge? Did you choose to PhD or not to PhD? 
  2. What influenced your decisions and the timing within your career?
  3. Do you think there is a ‘right time’ to start thinking about further researcher development or starting something like a PhD? 
  4. How can occupational therapists, at all levels of their careers, be supported to engage in further researcher development? Have you got any advice for others on how to best to engage in opportunities to develop and advance as a researcher, whether a PhD or alternative opportunities?
  5. What more can RCOT/Employers/universities do to support occupational therapists looking to progress research within their career?  
  6. What steps do you think you can take now to help you meet your research development goals? 

References: 

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (2021). Career Development Framework. London: RCOT. Available at: https://www.rcot.co.uk/publications/career-development-framework 

POST CHAT

Host: Beverley Turtle (@bevaturtle) and Samantha Tavender (@SamOTantha).

Support on OTalk Account: Beverley Turtle (@bevaturtle) and Samantha Tavender (@SamOTantha).

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk Tuesday 8th March 2022 – Simulated practice-based learning: the perceived value in supporting placement capacity?  

This week is hosted by @CarolynHay Pre-registration Education Manager at RCOT, with @Ruth_Hawley on the @OTalk_ account.  We’re going to talk about simulated practice-based learning (PBL).  

Simulated practice-based learning (limited to 40 hours within the minimum 1000 hours of successfully completed PBL) was incorporated into RCOT’s 2019 version of the Learning and development standards for pre-registration education.  At that time, there was limited use of simulation within placement related activities.  In fact, it was questioned why this addition was even needed.  

Not very many months later, a global pandemic prompted rapid and significant changes in the way practice-based learning needed to be delivered and supported.  Today there’s lots of discussion about whether 40 hours is enough! So, it would be great tonight to gain an understanding of your perceptions and experiences of simulation and in particular, simulation within practice-based learning.  

Let’s start at the beginning thinking about how your experiences of simulated practice-based learning.  Have you participated in simulated PBL as a learner, a person who uses occupational therapy services, or as an educator?

Simulation is defined by Bennett et al (2017 p314.) as ‘an education technique that recreates all or part of a clinical experience’.  RCOT’s Learning and development standards (2019) incorporate Reed’s work into their definition: ‘Artificially constructed environments designed to represent realistic scenarios that provide opportunities for learners to practise clinical and decision-making skills within a safe environment. It allows for repetition, feedback, evaluation and reflection, with examples including video based learning, role-playing interactions, scenarios where learners or others act as the person receiving occupational therapy services, scenarios using professionally trained actors, and the use of high-fidelity manikins (Reed 2014).’   What do you think are the defining characteristics of simulated PBL?

We know that students ‘find simulation to be a positive experience’ (Grant et al 2021 p354) but what support might students need to translate this simulated learning into practice?  And as those involved in supporting this learning within future placements, or as an employer of new graduates, what are your development needs?

Our final question is broad – what do you think the future of simulated practice-based learning could be within pre-registration education? There is, to date, limited research exploring simulated PBL beyond the learner experience and therefore limited evidence to support increasing the current maximum of 40 hours of simulated practice-based learning within the Learning and development standards (RCOT 2019).  What are your thoughts in relation to this?

We’ll use the following questions to prompt thinking during our hour together:

  1. Have you participated/experienced simulated practice-based learning? In what ways? (86)
  2. What do you think the defining characteristics are of simulated practice-based learning? (91)
  3. What support is needed for learners in translating learning from simulated practice-based learning into practice? (117)
  4. What support is needed for practice educators and employers of newly registered occupational therapists in translating learning from simulated practice-based learning into practice? (185)
  5. We know that learners find simulation a positive experience – what do you think the future of simulated practice-based learning could be within pre-registration education? (175)

References

Grant T, Thomas Y, Gossman P, Berragan (2021) The use of simulation in occupational therapy education: A scoping review. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1440-1630.12726  

Reed HE (2014) An examination of critical thinking skills in traditional and simulated environments for occupational therapy students. Doctor of Education Leadership (EdLD). San Diego, CA: San Diego State University. Available at: https://sdsu-dspace.calstate.edu/ bitstream/handle/10211.3/137693/Reed_sdsu_0220D_10629.pdf?sequence=1 Accessed on 13.03.19.

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (2019) Learning and development standards for pre-registration education. London: RCOT. Available at: https://www.rcot.co.uk/practice-resources/rcot-publications/learning-and-development-standards-pre-registration-education  Accessed on 14.04.21

POST CHAT

Host:   @CarolynHay Pre-registration Education Manager at RCOT,

Support on OTalk Account: @Ruth_Hawley

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?https://otalk.co.uk/reflection-logs/

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.
OTalk

#OTalk Tuesday 8th Feb 2022 – Social Prescribing – past, present and future with @smileyfacehalo

This week Sam Pywell (@smileyfacehalo), Coordinator: Social Prescribing Unit @UCLan (@UCLanSocPres) lead us in a discussion about social prescribing, here is what she had to say.


Hi everyone and welcome to this weeks #OTalk on Social Prescribing: past, present and future – my name is Sam Pywell and I’m an Occupational Therapy lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, U.K. Recently I have taken the role of Coordinating our Social Prescribing Unit at UCLan and have been reflecting on how we as occupational therapists continue to support and get involved with the Social Prescribing arena. Please follow our unit on @UCLanSocPres, and I hope you enjoy this #OTalk!!!!!

Occupational therapists can manage, deliver, create, influence, research, teach, support and contribute to social prescribing as part of the NHS Personalised Care agenda (NHS, 2019; NHS, 2022; RCOT, 2022; RSPH, 2019a; RSPH, 2019b). Social prescribing is defined by The Kings Fund as (2019) “…a means of enabling health professionals to refer people to a range of local, non-clinical services”. Occupational therapists can “…‘active signposting’, ‘refer to a link worker’, ‘promote, grow and develop social prescribing” (RSPH, 2019a) and be a social prescriber themselves (RSPH, 2019b). With the wide variety of social prescribing models (Polley et al., 2017; Morris et al., 2020) and people who can be involved (from link workers, community connectors, commissioners, health and social care professionals, private providers, voluntary and community sector) it is no wonder social prescribing remains a challenge to understand in its entirety (Khan, 2021).

For occupational therapists to contribute to this important agenda to address inequalities (potentially though “proportionate universalism” (NHS Scotland, 2014)) we need to respect and collaborate with the social prescribing arena, learn and actively contribute for the benefit of communities and individuals, but how do we do this? Placements, innovation and increasing the evidence base are examples of engaging the future workforce with the challenge of addressing inequalities and inequities which impact an individual’s overall wellbeing. However, the approach we all take to inequities and inequalities impacts the work we do. As Professor Michael Marmot highlighted, “Proportionate universalism” (NHS Scotland briefing, 2014) can be defined as “the resourcing and delivering of universal services at a scale and intensity proportionate to the degree of need”. How do we do this? How do we work together in the arena of social prescribing to address individual’s needs?

This #OTalk is following in the footsteps of work done by colleagues at @SalfordSocPres hub, the #OTalk in march last year by @adamjacksonot, and colleagues within the very large social prescribing arena.

Questions:
How could (and have) occupational therapists contribute to the social prescribing arena?
Where could occupational therapists go on placement re: social prescribing?
What is “proportionate universalism” in our practice? How does this fit with occupational therapy, social prescribing and our future practice?
Where do we go from here?

References

Jackson, A (2021) #OTalk 14th April – Social Prescribing and the future of Occupational Therapy. https://otalk.co.uk/2020/04/07/otalk-14th-april-social-prescribing-and-the-future-of-occupational-therapy/

Khan, K., Ward, F., Halliday, E., Holt, V. (2021) Public perspectives of social prescribing, Journal of Public Health, fdab067, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdab067

The Kings Fund (2019) What is Social Prescribing? https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/social-prescribing

NHS Scotland (2014) Proportionate Universalism briefing. http://www.healthscotland.com/uploads/documents/24296-ProportionateUniversalismBriefing.pdf

NHS (2019) Personalised Care agenda https://www.england.nhs.uk/personalisedcare/

NHS (2019) Long Term plan https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan/

NHS (2022) Social Prescribing https://www.england.nhs.uk/personalisedcare/social-prescribing/

Martin, C (2020) The Social Prescriber role through Covid-19 https://www.theothub.com/article/a-reflective-account-of-the-social-prescriber-role-through-covid-19

Morris, D., Thomas, P., Ridley, J. et al. (2020) Community-Enhanced Social Prescribing: Integrating Community in Policy and Practice. Int. Journal of Com. WB https://doi.org/10.1007/s42413-020-00080-9
RCOT (2019) RCOT role in Social Prescribing https://www.rcot.co.uk/news/occupational-therapy-role-social-prescribing

Polley, M. et al. (2017) Making Sense of Social Prescribing. Westminster Research https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/download/f3cf4b949511304f762bdec137844251031072697ae511a462eac9150d6ba8e0/1340196/Making-sense-of-social-prescribing%202017.pdf

RSPH (2019a) Launch of new social prescribing framework for allied health professionals https://www.rsph.org.uk/about-us/news/launch-of-new-social-prescribing-framework-for-allied-health-professionals.html

RSPH (2019b) AHP as prescriber https://www.rsph.org.uk/our-work/resources/ahp-social-prescribing-frameworks/social-prescribing-ahp-as-prescriber.html

POST CHAT 

Host:  Sam Pywell (@smileyfacehalo)

Support on OTalk Account: @otrach

Evidence your CPD. If you joined in this chat you can download the below transcript as evidence for your CPD, but remember the HCPC are interested in what you have learnt.  So why not complete one of our reflection logs to evidence your learning?

HCPC Standards for CPD.

  • Maintain a continuous, up-to-date and accurate record of their CPD activities.
  • Demonstrate that their CPD activities are a mixture of learning activities relevant to current or future practice.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD has contributed to the quality of their practice and service delivery.
  • Seek to ensure that their CPD benefits the service user.
  • Upon request, present a written profile (which must be their own work and supported by evidence) explaining how they have met the Standards for CPD.