#OTalk -23 April 2019 – Continuing Professional Development

Hello #OTalk, this evening we thought it would a good idea to have a general chat about all things Continued Professional Development. It has been a little while since we had a general chat on this topic, but here are a few links to previous chats we have had to help get our thoughts flowing….

#OTalk 10th April 2018 – How to record your CPD

#OTalk 17th October – CPD and service quality

#OTalk 11th July – CPD is more than HCPC audit. How to strategically manage your Continuing Professional Development.

#OTalk 29th March OT – Shifting CPD Focus

The following are some posters and articles that are of course always worth a mention

#COT2017 Clicking your way through continuing professional development? Poster 26

the above poster was also followed up with this article 
Attitudes to social media use as a platform for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) within occupational therapy

and of course  The use of Twitter for continuing professional development within occupational therapy  (Open Access).

As a predominantly UK based chat most of those who join us will be either currently or due to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Whilst engaging in CPD is not all about audit it is wise to ensure that you utilise your CPD activity in a way that will support your profile if are are called for audit. Here is a link to the HCPC’s CPD resources https://www.hcpc-uk.org/cpd/

To aid us in answering your questions please fill in this quick form to help us keep track of the questions and  ensure that we don’t miss any of your questions during the chat My question about CPD for the general chat on 23rd April 2019.

We look forward to asking all your questions of the community and supporting another great chat.

 

 

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#OTalk 9th April 2019 Community Ideas

This week we thought it would be a good idea to have a community idea chat.

This will give everyone an opportunity to have a think about future topics the community would like to discuss.

The themes will be flexible and open to change as the discussion progresses, but some things to think about in preparation:

Have you been wanting to host a chat, but not committed to a date yet?

Do you have any questions that are holding you back from hosting?

Would you like to co-host a chat with someone who shares a passion for a topic? maybe this could be just opportunity to link up, or we could could compile a list?

Have you attended a talk or CPD session and would like to suggest we approach someone to host a chat?

Have you read an article recently that would be a good starting point for a discussion?

What about other media that may of sparked an idea? Maybe a YouTube video or a podcast?

Any other suggestions?

We look forward to tweeting with all your wonderful ideas.

The #OTalk organising team.

POST CHAT

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript April 9th 2019

The Numbers

896.881K Impressions
125 Tweets
16 Participants
100 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

#OTalk Research 2nd April 2019

This weeks #OTalk is hosted by Dr. Rob Brooks, Course Director for Occupational Therapy at Leeds Beckett University. As his blog below outlines, Rob has based this week’s chat questions on feedback from pre-registration students on their experiences of research. Join Rob on Tuesday 2nd Aril at 8pm to discuss your thoughts on this topic.

Pre-registration Research “Never again!”

We would not argue with the notion that occupational therapists need to be able to interpret research and apply this to their practice. Most occupational therapists have received some research training; indeed, the Royal College of Occupational Therapists standard for pre-registration education states that an entry level therapist should be able to:

  1. Select and justify designs, methods and ethics appropriate to research in occupation and occupational therapy.
  2. Disseminate research findings in a variety of appropriate ways within and beyond the profession.

Despite research being embedded in pre-registration education, engagement with research in clinical practice is variable and the number of researchers in the profession remains limited. The reasons for this are complex, I would suggest that how students experience research in pre-registration programmes is a contributing factor.

There is little published research on the experience of research by pre-registration students. When I think about what pre-registration occupational therapy students have told me about their experiences they fit into two groups. The first is the “never again!” group. This group find the process of conducting research tortuous and they often struggle to feel skilled in using research in their practice. I worry that we have alienated this group of students from research. The reasons for this can be multi-factorial – was it the way in which research was taught, was it the type of study they carried out, was it difficulty in applying the research to practice? Each student will have their own story.

The second group is those who like research (yes, there are some!). These are the students who find research stimulating and engaging. I do however have concerns about these students too. These students are skilled in research and have the potential to be the future researchers of the profession, yet when they go into graduate jobs we fail to use or nurture their research skills. Again, we can deconstruct a number or reasons – senior staff who themselves feel threatened by research knowledge, lack of opportunity/time to carry out further research, the perception that research is for senior therapists.

Question 1
What were your experiences of pre-registration research?

Question 2
Is pre-registration research actually useful?

Question 3
What could universities do differently to make research more accessible/enjoyable for pre-registration students?

Question 4
What types of research should pre-registration students be conducting?

Question 5
How can clinicians/managers use the research skills of new graduates?

Question 6
What should clinicians and academics do to talent spot potential future researchers?

Post Chat

Host: Dr. Rob Brooks

Online Transcript

The Numbers

42.443K Impressions
25 Tweets
22 Participants
Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

Data for #OTalk can be up to 15 minutes delayed

 

#OTalk – 26th March 2019 The Intentional Relationship Model.

This weeks chat will be all about the The Intentional Relationship Model and host by Carolina Cordero @Colourful_OT

The Intentional Relationship Model (Taylor, 2008) outlines the process by which occupational therapists build therapeutic relationships with the people we work with. It looks at therapist-client interactions in terms of factors including the client’s interpersonal characteristics (of which there are 12 types) and the “inevitable interpersonal events” that can occur during the therapy process (of which there are 11). The model also describes six “modes” in which occupational therapists relate to and engage with their clients:

  • Advocating
  • Collaborating
  • Empathizing
  • Encouraging
  • Instructing
  • Problem-solving

The Intentional Relationship Model, as its name suggests, emphasises the need for therapeutic use of self to be something that occupational therapists engage in deliberately, giving careful consideration to which mode we use with which client and in response to which situation. This presents an interesting viewpoint on therapeutic use of self, which can often be nebulous and difficult to define, as a skill that can be broken down into a deliberate process of interpersonal reasoning. However, is it overly reductionist to view the therapeutic relationship in this way? Are there interpersonal characteristics, interpersonal events and therapeutic modes outside of those defined by the model? All questions worth asking in tonight’s #OTalk!

Tonight’s questions are:

1. Have you come across the Intentional Relationship Model (IRM) before? If not, what is your first impression of it?

2. What is your own preferred therapeutic mode? (questionnaire available here: https://irm.ahslabs.uic.edu/assessments/)

3. Do you feel that the IRM accurately describes therapeutic use of self in OT?

4. Do you think the IRM could be a good tool for teaching interpersonal skills to OT students?

Taylor, R. R. (2008). The intentional relationship: Occupational therapy and use of self. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis.

Post Chat

Host: Carolina Cordero @Colourful_OT

OTalk Support: @kirstieot

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript March 26th 2019

The Numbers

801.692K Impressions
170 Tweets
53 Participants
Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

Data for #OTalk can be up to 15 minutes delayed

 

#OTalk Research 5th March 2019

This month the #OTalk Research chat is on the topic of Mixed Methods in Occupational Therapy focused research and will be hosted by Naomi Gallant @naomi_gallant here is what she had to say…

Following a stimulating and informative presentation and discussion with the Occupational Therapy Doctoral group via video call on Monday evening, it was fitting to open up discussion with the Occupational Therapy community about the use of mixed methods in research. As the name suggests, mixed methods is a methodological approach to research which includes a combination of quantitative and qualitative data collection, which naturally translates into data analysis. This is not to be confused with triangulation of methods, or multiple-method research, which can use a combination of methods which are all quantitative or all qualitative. The mixed methods design is being used increasingly in researching and applying findings to health settings and complex health phenomena. A pragmatic paradigm is often favoured when approaching mixed methods – use whatever is needed to answer the question in the best way.

Some key points for further discussion jumped out to me during our video call. People had come across, and were anticipating different challenges to using mixed methods in research. These included: being able to justify and convince others (including supervisors) that mixed methods was an appropriate approach; mixing opposing research paradigms; making decisions about sequential or parallel mixed methods typologies; where to publish mixed methods research; and adequately analysing the quantitative and qualitative data.

So, I wanted to open up some questions to the floor to further our discussions from Monday, create an opportunity to share experiences and see what everyone else thinks about using mixed methods research in Occupational Therapy focused research.

1. Let’s start by hearing what people’s experiences are of using, or seeing, mixed methods research, in action

2. How do we address the opposing research paradigms of quantitative and qualitative research when designing mixed methods research?

3. Does an Occupational Therapy perspective side with a particular research paradigm?

4. Why could mixed methods research be particularly useful to Occupational Therapy areas of research?

5. What quality criteria guidelines could be used to ensure rigorous and persuasive research is conducted?

Post Chat

Host: @naomi_gallant

Support on the @OTalk_ Account: @LynneGoodacre

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript March 5th 2019

he Numbers

241.845KImpressions
45Tweets
13Participants
36Avg Tweets/Hour
3Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

 

#OTalk 26th February 2019 – My Journey thus far towards Advanced Clinical Practice

This weeks chat will be hosted by Carol Rideout @carspring27 and Dr Stephanie Tempest @SetG75 

My Journey thus far towards Advanced Clinical Practice

I am at the top of Band 6 working in an NHS community neuro rehab team, qualified since 1998 and based in the UK.  My career journey thus far has been varied between acute and community settings, in Social Care and NHS.   Despite working part-time and being a parent, I still have an innate drive towards my own personal and professional development.  I have more recently started to question where can I go career wise and what career paths are open to me? 

I became more aware of Advanced Clinical Practitioners (ACPs) last year and began asking colleagues and Managers if this may be a route which I could pursue.  I was baffled to hear that this route was for Nurses and Physiotherapists mainly and not applicable to me working as an Occupational Therapist in community neuro. 

This stimulated me to research and read and I have since discovered that in the UK there is a clear framework and definition for the ACP role and it turns out that this is well within the scope of our profession.  I have since seen there are increasing ACP roles being advertised particularly in the NHS and have learnt that the ACP framework in the UK describes the level of practice required, to be able to prove clinicians are working at this level.

I am now in pursuit of an MSc in Advanced Clinical Practice in the hope that this will enable me to progress in all four areas as described in the Career Development Framework. I appreciate this may not lead me directly into an ACP job role, however, it may equip me to be able to demonstrate in due course, to Health Education England, that I am able to work at an ACP level.  This may lead to me being able to justify to my line managers why I can legitimately be called and recognised as an ACP.  I do not expect that this will be an easy journey and would like to gain support from the OT community to generate ideas how we can push forward this ACP agenda, how we can encourage each other to progress and climb our profession into new heights.

Questions:

  1. Please can you say hello and describe what setting you work in and your location.
  2. Can you describe / detail your interest in the ACP role thus far and your current level of practice?
  3. Can you describe how you have or how you might negotiate your way into an ACP role at work?
  4. Can you give any advice to someone who may want to progress into being an ACP?
  5. Let’s discuss what Occupational Therapists can bring to the ACP role?

Post Chat

Host: Dr Stephanie Tempest @SetG75 

Support on OTalk account: Rachel Booth @otrach

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 26th 2019

862.184K Impressions
250 Tweets
23 Participants
81 Avg Tweets/Hour
11 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants


 

 

#OTalk 19 February 2019 – Assessments

OTalk 19th February 2019 (8-9 pm GMT)
This week’s #OTalk is on the topic of choosing assessments and will be hosted by Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) from York St John University and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61) in the UK.

Here’s what Alison and Diane had to say:

Assessment and outcome measurement are fundamental aspects of the Occupational Therapy process and learning about assessment and evaluation is a core component of occupational therapy education. Assessment requires occupational therapists to select and apply a range of informal and standardised data collection methods (interviews, observations, questionnaires and document review) and access a range of sources (the person, other health and social care staff involved in the person’s care, and informal care givers). Information collected through assessment needs to be accurate because it informs ‘the negotiation of outcomes, setting of goals, and selection of therapeutic interventions’ (Laver-Fawcett, 2012, p. 604). Assessment is usually conducted at several points during the occupational therapy process, this can include: an initial assessment to inform goal setting and provide a baseline; ongoing assessment to review the person’s response to intervention; evaluation of outcomes at the end of intervention; and post-discharge follow-up review (Creek, 2003).

So the choices we make about what assessments to use and when to use them are critically important.

Whether you are an experienced researcher, a clinician or a student please join us on 19th February for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experience. It is never too early in your occupational therapy career to start considering why you choose the assessments and outcome measures you use.

Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus our chat:

1. What are we looking for in an assessment?
2. When choosing an assessment what does it need to have?
3. Thinking about assessment tools or standard measures – what is the most important feature it has?
4. Why do you choose the measures you use?
5. If learning about assessment and measures what would you like to know?
6. What was the most useful tip you have for thinking about which assessment tool to use?
7. Do you have a particular resource, website or book that you use that you find helpful and would recommend to OT students and colleagues?

References:

Creek J (2003) Occupational therapy defined as a complex intervention. London: College of Occupational Therapists.

Laver-Fawcett, A J (2014) Routine standardised outcome measurement to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions: essential or optional? Ergoterapeuten, 4, 28-37. [accessed 17.2.2019]
http://www.ergoterapeuten.no/Admin/Public/Download.aspx?file=Files%2fFiles%2fFagartikler%2foutcome.pdf

Resources:

College of Occupational Therapists’ (COT; 2017) Position Statement: Occupational therapists’ use of standardized outcome measures. London, COT. Available from: file:///C:/Users/a.laverfawcett/Downloads/COT-Position-Statement-measuring-outcomes%20(1).pdf [accessed 17.2.2019]

Laver Fawcett AJ (2007) Principles of Assessment and Outcome Measurement for Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists: Theory, Skills and Application. Chichester. Wiley. Available from:
https://www.wiley.com/en-gb/Principles+of+Assessment+and+Outcome+Measurement+for+Occupational+Therapists+and+Physiotherapists%3A+Theory%2C+Skills+and+Application-p-9781861564801 [accessed 16.2.2019]

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (nd). Developing an assessment tool or outcome measure. Available from: https://www.rcot.co.uk/practice-resources/library-resources/assessments-and-outcome-measures [accessed 16.2.2019]

Post Chat

Host: Prof Diane Cox @dianecox61

Support on Otalk account: @colourful_ot

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

The Numbers

1.295M Impressions
400 Tweets
40 Participants
98 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants