19th March 2019 #OTalk Gaming a meaningful occupation or a Damaging occupation?

This week our very own Rachel Booth @otrach will be hosting a chat looking at gaming a meaningful occupation or a Damaging occupation?

In 2018 the World Health Organisation added gaming disorder to its list of mental health conditions.

It stated

‘Gaming disorder is characterised by a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour (‘digital gaming’ or ‘video-gaming’), which may be online (i.e., over the internet) or offline.

Manifested by: 

  1. impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context); 
  2. 2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities; 
  3. Continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences. 

The behaviour pattern is of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning. 

The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent. 

The gaming behaviour and other features are normally evident over a period of at least 12 months in order for a diagnosis to be assigned, although the required duration may be shortened if all diagnostic requirements are met and symptoms are severe.’

What I thought was interesting about this definition was the use of occupation functioning.

So for this week’s #OTalk I through it might be interesting to explore the use of this occupation, as a treatment tool and how as an occupational therapist we might work with someone who is given this diagnosis.

Question 1 

Do you game? If so what type and why?

Question 2

How much time do you spend gaming in an average week? 

Question 3 

What are you thoughts on the world health organisation adding addiction to gaming as category of mental disorder?  

Question 4

Do you used gaming, as an intervention/treatment? If so how and why?

Question 5

How might an occupational therapist work with someone who’s gaming behaviour pattern is of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment occupational functioning?

Question 6 

On the whole do you feel Gaming is a meaningful or damaging occupation?

Ref 

https://www.who.int/features/qa/gaming-disorder/en/

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12th March #OTalk –   Mental Health Occupational Therapy outcomes in clinical practice and how to measure them.

This Tuesday  Emma Hall, Mary Birken, Mandy Graham and Sophie Faulkner host  #OTalk –   Mental Health Occupational Therapy outcomes in clinical practice and how to measure them.

Measuring the outcomes of mental health occupational therapy interventions is vital to demonstrate changes or improvements for people using our services, and the contribution of occupational therapy in meeting the objectives of clinical services, and assuring quality.

HCPC state in their standards of proficiency for occupational therapists, that they must:

“be able to evaluate intervention plans using recognised outcome measures and revise the plans as necessary in conjunction with the service user” (HCPC, 2013)

Despite this, there are no recent published papers regarding mental health occupational therapy outcome measurement in the last five years, to guide best practice. Studies indicate that  outcome measurement is not routine practice (Birken, Couch and Morley, 2018; Morley, 2014). There is debate over which outcomes should we measure in occupational therapy clinical practice in mental health. How do we ensure outcome measurement tools used are meaningful and important to those using the service and the service?

This Otalk aims to generate discussion about what outcomes of occupational therapy interventions in mental health are important to service users and the clinical services, and how we should measure these and report these.

1) Why is it important to measure outcomes within occupational therapy?

2) What are the challenges to using outcome measures within mental health practice?

3)What outcome measures are you currently using?

4) How can we ensure that outcome measurement is client centred and meaningful?

5)How can we  demonstrate  that occupational therapy outcomes contribute to the service objectives?

References:

Birken, M., Couch, E. and Morley, M. (2017) Barriers and facilitators of participation in intervention research by mental health occupational therapists British Journal of Occupational Therapy 80 (9): 568-572.

Health and Care Professions Council (2013) The standards of proficiency for occupational therapists.

Morley, M. (2014) Evidencing What Works: Are Occupational Therapists Using Clinical Information Effectively? British Journal of Occupational Therapy 77 (12) 601-604.

 

Post Chat

Host: Emma Hall, @Emm_OT  Mary Birken, @MaryBirken Mandy Graham @MandyGrahamOT and Sophie Faulkner @sleepOTsophie

Support on the OTalk account: Gill @gilliancrossley

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript March 12th 2019

 

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