#OTalk 19 February 2019 – Assessments

OTalk 19th February 2019 (8-9 pm GMT)
This week’s #OTalk is on the topic of choosing assessments and will be hosted by Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) from York St John University and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61) in the UK.

Here’s what Alison and Diane had to say:

Assessment and outcome measurement are fundamental aspects of the Occupational Therapy process and learning about assessment and evaluation is a core component of occupational therapy education. Assessment requires occupational therapists to select and apply a range of informal and standardised data collection methods (interviews, observations, questionnaires and document review) and access a range of sources (the person, other health and social care staff involved in the person’s care, and informal care givers). Information collected through assessment needs to be accurate because it informs ‘the negotiation of outcomes, setting of goals, and selection of therapeutic interventions’ (Laver-Fawcett, 2012, p. 604). Assessment is usually conducted at several points during the occupational therapy process, this can include: an initial assessment to inform goal setting and provide a baseline; ongoing assessment to review the person’s response to intervention; evaluation of outcomes at the end of intervention; and post-discharge follow-up review (Creek, 2003).

So the choices we make about what assessments to use and when to use them are critically important.

Whether you are an experienced researcher, a clinician or a student please join us on 19th February for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experience. It is never too early in your occupational therapy career to start considering why you choose the assessments and outcome measures you use.

Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus our chat:

1. What are we looking for in an assessment?
2. When choosing an assessment what does it need to have?
3. Thinking about assessment tools or standard measures – what is the most important feature it has?
4. Why do you choose the measures you use?
5. If learning about assessment and measures what would you like to know?
6. What was the most useful tip you have for thinking about which assessment tool to use?
7. Do you have a particular resource, website or book that you use that you find helpful and would recommend to OT students and colleagues?

References:

Creek J (2003) Occupational therapy defined as a complex intervention. London: College of Occupational Therapists.

Laver-Fawcett, A J (2014) Routine standardised outcome measurement to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions: essential or optional? Ergoterapeuten, 4, 28-37. [accessed 17.2.2019]
http://www.ergoterapeuten.no/Admin/Public/Download.aspx?file=Files%2fFiles%2fFagartikler%2foutcome.pdf

Resources:

College of Occupational Therapists’ (COT; 2017) Position Statement: Occupational therapists’ use of standardized outcome measures. London, COT. Available from: file:///C:/Users/a.laverfawcett/Downloads/COT-Position-Statement-measuring-outcomes%20(1).pdf [accessed 17.2.2019]

Laver Fawcett AJ (2007) Principles of Assessment and Outcome Measurement for Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists: Theory, Skills and Application. Chichester. Wiley. Available from:
https://www.wiley.com/en-gb/Principles+of+Assessment+and+Outcome+Measurement+for+Occupational+Therapists+and+Physiotherapists%3A+Theory%2C+Skills+and+Application-p-9781861564801 [accessed 16.2.2019]

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (nd). Developing an assessment tool or outcome measure. Available from: https://www.rcot.co.uk/practice-resources/library-resources/assessments-and-outcome-measures [accessed 16.2.2019]

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#OTalk – 12th February 2019 – TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

This weeks chat will be hosted by Ruth Ndlovu @NeuroOT_Ruth.

TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

A severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a condition where the patient has been in an unconscious state for 6 hours a more and to be in post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) for more than 24hours (Headway 2019). Patients who present with severe TBI are often hospitalised and depending on the severity of their injury they can be referred for rehabilitation.

Cognitive rehabilitation attempts to enhance functioning and independence in patients with cognitive impairments following brain injury or disease. Cognitive rehab consists of a diverse of interventions including restorative and compensatory approach. Restorative approach aims to restore functions that have been impaired following injury or diseases through task repetition. Whereas compensatory approach aims to restore function by use of compensatory strategies such as external memory aids e.g. calendars, diaries and use of electronic devices.

  1. What assessments/tools do you use in your setting for patients in PTA post TBI?
  2. As a team/discipline, how do you determine a patient is out of PTA?
  3. What cognitive assessments are commonly used for patients with a TBI? These can be standardised or non-standardised.
  4. What cognitive interventions or approaches do you use for TBI patients?

References:

Headway (2019) Traumatic Brain Injury [online] accessed on 27.01.2019 at https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/types-of-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury/

#OTalk Research is back for its first chat of 2019. Our first talk is on an important step of any research, the pilot study. #Otalk Research Tuesday 5 th February, 2019

A pilot study is a small study conducted in advance of a planned project, specifically to
test aspects of the research design and to allow necessary adjustment before final
commitment to the research design. A study should not be simply labelled a 'pilot study'
by researchers hoping to justify a small sample size. Regardless of the research design,
quantitative or qualitative, the pilot study is an important part of the research design
process which should inform researchers about the best way to conduct the future, full
scale project.
Join Jenny and Nikki from the #Otalk team in next week’s chat if you have experience of
using pilot studies, in the process of designing a pilot study or would like to learn more to
help you evaluate studies. We will be discussing;

1. What the term ‘pilot study’ means to you and what you think are the main reasons to
conduct a pilot study.
2. Your experiences of conducting, observing or taking part in a pilot study
3. Benefits observed from pilot studies
4. Challenges in relation to pilot studies
5. When you know if you have done enough piloting to execute a larger scale study