#OTalk Research 5th March 2019

This month the #OTalk Research chat is on the topic of Mixed Methods in Occupational Therapy focused research and will be hosted by Naomi Gallant @naomi_gallant here is what she had to say…

Following a stimulating and informative presentation and discussion with the Occupational Therapy Doctoral group via video call on Monday evening, it was fitting to open up discussion with the Occupational Therapy community about the use of mixed methods in research. As the name suggests, mixed methods is a methodological approach to research which includes a combination of quantitative and qualitative data collection, which naturally translates into data analysis. This is not to be confused with triangulation of methods, or multiple-method research, which can use a combination of methods which are all quantitative or all qualitative. The mixed methods design is being used increasingly in researching and applying findings to health settings and complex health phenomena. A pragmatic paradigm is often favoured when approaching mixed methods – use whatever is needed to answer the question in the best way.

Some key points for further discussion jumped out to me during our video call. People had come across, and were anticipating different challenges to using mixed methods in research. These included: being able to justify and convince others (including supervisors) that mixed methods was an appropriate approach; mixing opposing research paradigms; making decisions about sequential or parallel mixed methods typologies; where to publish mixed methods research; and adequately analysing the quantitative and qualitative data.

So, I wanted to open up some questions to the floor to further our discussions from Monday, create an opportunity to share experiences and see what everyone else thinks about using mixed methods research in Occupational Therapy focused research.

1. Let’s start by hearing what people’s experiences are of using, or seeing, mixed methods research, in action

2. How do we address the opposing research paradigms of quantitative and qualitative research when designing mixed methods research?

3. Does an Occupational Therapy perspective side with a particular research paradigm?

4. Why could mixed methods research be particularly useful to Occupational Therapy areas of research?

5. What quality criteria guidelines could be used to ensure rigorous and persuasive research is conducted?

Post Chat

Host: @naomi_gallant

Support on the @OTalk_ Account: @LynneGoodacre

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript March 5th 2019

he Numbers

241.845KImpressions
45Tweets
13Participants
36Avg Tweets/Hour
3Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

 

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#OTalk 26th February 2019 – My Journey thus far towards Advanced Clinical Practice

This weeks chat will be hosted by Carol Rideout @carspring27 and Dr Stephanie Tempest @SetG75 

My Journey thus far towards Advanced Clinical Practice

I am at the top of Band 6 working in an NHS community neuro rehab team, qualified since 1998 and based in the UK.  My career journey thus far has been varied between acute and community settings, in Social Care and NHS.   Despite working part-time and being a parent, I still have an innate drive towards my own personal and professional development.  I have more recently started to question where can I go career wise and what career paths are open to me? 

I became more aware of Advanced Clinical Practitioners (ACPs) last year and began asking colleagues and Managers if this may be a route which I could pursue.  I was baffled to hear that this route was for Nurses and Physiotherapists mainly and not applicable to me working as an Occupational Therapist in community neuro. 

This stimulated me to research and read and I have since discovered that in the UK there is a clear framework and definition for the ACP role and it turns out that this is well within the scope of our profession.  I have since seen there are increasing ACP roles being advertised particularly in the NHS and have learnt that the ACP framework in the UK describes the level of practice required, to be able to prove clinicians are working at this level.

I am now in pursuit of an MSc in Advanced Clinical Practice in the hope that this will enable me to progress in all four areas as described in the Career Development Framework. I appreciate this may not lead me directly into an ACP job role, however, it may equip me to be able to demonstrate in due course, to Health Education England, that I am able to work at an ACP level.  This may lead to me being able to justify to my line managers why I can legitimately be called and recognised as an ACP.  I do not expect that this will be an easy journey and would like to gain support from the OT community to generate ideas how we can push forward this ACP agenda, how we can encourage each other to progress and climb our profession into new heights.

Questions:

  1. Please can you say hello and describe what setting you work in and your location.
  2. Can you describe / detail your interest in the ACP role thus far and your current level of practice?
  3. Can you describe how you have or how you might negotiate your way into an ACP role at work?
  4. Can you give any advice to someone who may want to progress into being an ACP?
  5. Let’s discuss what Occupational Therapists can bring to the ACP role?

Post Chat

Host: Dr Stephanie Tempest @SetG75 

Support on OTalk account: Rachel Booth @otrach

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 26th 2019

862.184K Impressions
250 Tweets
23 Participants
81 Avg Tweets/Hour
11 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants


 

 

#OTalk 19 February 2019 – Assessments

OTalk 19th February 2019 (8-9 pm GMT)
This week’s #OTalk is on the topic of choosing assessments and will be hosted by Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) from York St John University and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61) in the UK.

Here’s what Alison and Diane had to say:

Assessment and outcome measurement are fundamental aspects of the Occupational Therapy process and learning about assessment and evaluation is a core component of occupational therapy education. Assessment requires occupational therapists to select and apply a range of informal and standardised data collection methods (interviews, observations, questionnaires and document review) and access a range of sources (the person, other health and social care staff involved in the person’s care, and informal care givers). Information collected through assessment needs to be accurate because it informs ‘the negotiation of outcomes, setting of goals, and selection of therapeutic interventions’ (Laver-Fawcett, 2012, p. 604). Assessment is usually conducted at several points during the occupational therapy process, this can include: an initial assessment to inform goal setting and provide a baseline; ongoing assessment to review the person’s response to intervention; evaluation of outcomes at the end of intervention; and post-discharge follow-up review (Creek, 2003).

So the choices we make about what assessments to use and when to use them are critically important.

Whether you are an experienced researcher, a clinician or a student please join us on 19th February for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experience. It is never too early in your occupational therapy career to start considering why you choose the assessments and outcome measures you use.

Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus our chat:

1. What are we looking for in an assessment?
2. When choosing an assessment what does it need to have?
3. Thinking about assessment tools or standard measures – what is the most important feature it has?
4. Why do you choose the measures you use?
5. If learning about assessment and measures what would you like to know?
6. What was the most useful tip you have for thinking about which assessment tool to use?
7. Do you have a particular resource, website or book that you use that you find helpful and would recommend to OT students and colleagues?

References:

Creek J (2003) Occupational therapy defined as a complex intervention. London: College of Occupational Therapists.

Laver-Fawcett, A J (2014) Routine standardised outcome measurement to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions: essential or optional? Ergoterapeuten, 4, 28-37. [accessed 17.2.2019]
http://www.ergoterapeuten.no/Admin/Public/Download.aspx?file=Files%2fFiles%2fFagartikler%2foutcome.pdf

Resources:

College of Occupational Therapists’ (COT; 2017) Position Statement: Occupational therapists’ use of standardized outcome measures. London, COT. Available from: file:///C:/Users/a.laverfawcett/Downloads/COT-Position-Statement-measuring-outcomes%20(1).pdf [accessed 17.2.2019]

Laver Fawcett AJ (2007) Principles of Assessment and Outcome Measurement for Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists: Theory, Skills and Application. Chichester. Wiley. Available from:
https://www.wiley.com/en-gb/Principles+of+Assessment+and+Outcome+Measurement+for+Occupational+Therapists+and+Physiotherapists%3A+Theory%2C+Skills+and+Application-p-9781861564801 [accessed 16.2.2019]

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (nd). Developing an assessment tool or outcome measure. Available from: https://www.rcot.co.uk/practice-resources/library-resources/assessments-and-outcome-measures [accessed 16.2.2019]

Post Chat

Host: Prof Diane Cox @dianecox61

Support on Otalk account: @colourful_ot

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

The Numbers

1.295M Impressions
400 Tweets
40 Participants
98 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

#OTalk – 12th February 2019 – TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

This weeks chat will be hosted by Ruth Ndlovu @NeuroOT_Ruth.

TBI and Cognitive rehabilitation:

A severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a condition where the patient has been in an unconscious state for 6 hours a more and to be in post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) for more than 24hours (Headway 2019). Patients who present with severe TBI are often hospitalised and depending on the severity of their injury they can be referred for rehabilitation.

Cognitive rehabilitation attempts to enhance functioning and independence in patients with cognitive impairments following brain injury or disease. Cognitive rehab consists of a diverse of interventions including restorative and compensatory approach. Restorative approach aims to restore functions that have been impaired following injury or diseases through task repetition. Whereas compensatory approach aims to restore function by use of compensatory strategies such as external memory aids e.g. calendars, diaries and use of electronic devices.

  1. What assessments/tools do you use in your setting for patients in PTA post TBI?
  2. As a team/discipline, how do you determine a patient is out of PTA?
  3. What cognitive assessments are commonly used for patients with a TBI? These can be standardised or non-standardised.
  4. What cognitive interventions or approaches do you use for TBI patients?

References:

Headway (2019) Traumatic Brain Injury [online] accessed on 27.01.2019 at https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/types-of-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury/

Post Chat

Host: Ruth Ndlovu @NeuroOT_Ruth.

Support on Otalk account:

Online Transcript

12th Feb 2019 #OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript

The Numbers

921.753K Impressions
188 Tweets
25 Participants
61 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

#OTalk Research is back for its first chat of 2019. Our first talk is on an important step of any research, the pilot study. #Otalk Research Tuesday 5 th February, 2019

A pilot study is a small study conducted in advance of a planned project, specifically to
test aspects of the research design and to allow necessary adjustment before final
commitment to the research design. A study should not be simply labelled a ‘pilot study’
by researchers hoping to justify a small sample size. Regardless of the research design,
quantitative or qualitative, the pilot study is an important part of the research design
process which should inform researchers about the best way to conduct the future, full
scale project.
Join Jenny and Nikki from the #Otalk team in next week’s chat if you have experience of
using pilot studies, in the process of designing a pilot study or would like to learn more to
help you evaluate studies. We will be discussing;

1. What the term ‘pilot study’ means to you and what you think are the main reasons to
conduct a pilot study.
2. Your experiences of conducting, observing or taking part in a pilot study
3. Benefits observed from pilot studies
4. Challenges in relation to pilot studies
5. When you know if you have done enough piloting to execute a larger scale study

Post Chat

Host: @NikkiDanielsOT and @preston_jenny

Support on Otalk: @NikkiDanielsOT and @preston_jenny

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript February 5th 2019

The Numbers

790.477K Impressions
218 Tweets
30 Participants
105 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants