Position Open – #OTalk Student Digital Leader Intern

#OTalk Student Digital Leader Intern (17/18) Position Open

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#OTalk is a community that welcomes students alongside practitioners and academics, recognising the vital role students can play in bringing fresh knowledge, innovation and enthusiasm to the community.  

To foster this collaboration, in 2015 #OTalk introduced the position of Student Digital Leader.  This Intern role offers a student the opportunity to become involved in the running of #OTalk for 6-12 months whilst receiving mentoring in digital leadership from the team.

Being part of the #OTalk team allows you to be creative, innovate and work as part of team. As a Student Digital Leader Intern these are some of the activities you could be involved in and be responsible for during your internship:

OTalk Project.

As part of your internship we hope you would be able to contribute in an innovative way to the #OTalk community by undertaking some form of project. This will be agreed between yourself and the rest of the OTalk team after you join the team.

OTalk Blog – Transcript posting.

To support the team in posting blog transcripts on the blog posts within 48 hours of a chat and sharing this with the #OTalk community on the social media platforms.

OTalk Facebook.

To monitor the facebook page, replying to comments and ensuring blogs have been shared within other relevant pages and groups (e.g. 4OT groups and Student Occupational Therapy groups/pages)

OTalk Twitter – Promoting.

To regularly tweet from OTalk and personal accounts to promote the chats and other related activities.

OTalk Twitter – Follows.

To review follows on the OTalk Twitter account, block spam accounts and to follow back/create lists for the OTalk account.

OTalk Twitter – Hosting.

To host a minimum of one chat during the internship and to support an additional two chats with guest hosts (Training will be provided – more can be hosted as desired).

Promoting OTalk.

To take and create opportunities to promote #OTalk and the benefits of professional social media use within university populations and regional/geographical networks.

OTalk Experience Summary.

Along with the OTalk crew,  write up an account of the experience of interning for publication.  This can be done in a range of ways and we are open to finding new and creative ways to share this experience Our first intern Kelly did this by displaying a poster at #COT2016 and our second Kirstie wrote a piece with Kelly for OTNews.

OTalk Development.

Engagement in online team meetings to review chat effectiveness, suggest future development and feedback on the relevance of OTalk for students.

Interns ideally need to be:

  • Excellent communicators
  • Familiar with the use of twitter
  • Familiar with the use of gmail, google calendars and google drive
  • Familiar with the use of skype
  • Familiar with wordpress blog editing dashboard
  • Able to create PDFs of transcripts and certificates
  • Available on Tuesday nights between 8pm – 9pm at least once a month
  • Available for 30 minutes on Thursday or Fridays to post chat transcript
  • Able to access the Internet and have a laptop/smartphone that will enable blog editing and twitter/Facebook access.
  • Passionate about the occupational therapy profession
  • Promoters of the positive application of social networking for professional development
  • Responsible and professional in their use of social media (social media accounts of applicants will be reviewed as part of the application process)
  • Engaging with CPD on a regular basis

Training to use the relevant software will be provided so please still apply if you meet most of the outline above.

If you are interested in this position please send the following information to otalk.occhat@gmail.com:

  • A personal statement of no more than 500 words demonstrating your suitability for the internship.
  • A Biography of between 100-200 words (that includes your name and university, and a link to your LinkedIn profile) [Write this as if you are introducing yourself to the OTalk Community on the blog].
  • Your skype username.
  • The name and e-mail of a referee who can be contacted if you are invited to interview.

Please direct any queries to the our email or DM us on Twitter at @OTalk_

The closing date for applications is Tuesday 28th November at 23:59.

Shortlisted applicants will be invited to a skype interview in December and will be in post by January 2018.

 

 

 

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#OTalk 28th November – Frailty, Cancer and the role of OT

 

This weeks #Otalk is on the topic of “Frailty, cancer and the role of OT” and will be hosted by Jeni Woods and Helen Bowker (@Jeni_Woods_OT and @Bowker_Helen).

Here is what they have to say…

The demographics of the UK are changing with more people living longer. There are over 11.8 million people aged 65 or over in the UK with this figure set to rise by approximately 40% over the next 17 years (Age UK 2017). One of the most significant shifts in the population is that more people are living beyond the age of 85 (ONS 2016, Age UK 2017).

An ageing population brings some major challenges for health and social care. The number of people living with longer term conditions and multi-comorbidities increases with age, all of which will impact on the individual’s engagement in occupational roles, ADLs and social participation (Macmillan 2012, Age UK 2017). Age UK (2017) state that by the time an individual reaches their late 80s, over one in three people have difficulty in manging five or more activities of daily living.

Macmillan (2012) reported that the UK had the worst survival rates in Europe for older people. Given that the UK is faced with an ageing population, who potentially are living with multiple comorbidities and long-term conditions, it is important to review how we support older patients through their cancer journey.

Handforth et al (2015) state that over half of older cancer patients have frailty or pre-frailty, which can have the following consequences: increased risk of mortality, post-operative complications and cancer treatment intolerances.

Frailty is commonly associated with ageing with the British Geriatric Society (2015) defining it as a distinctive health state related to the ageing process in which multiple body systems gradually lose their in-built reserves.”

Frailty can have a significant impact on an individual’s ability to engage in activities of daily living. Frail older people often have more frequent unplanned admissions and readmissions, longer hospital stays, higher mortality rates and are more likely to require social care support on discharge (Age UK 2017, Torpy et al 2006, Oliver et al 2014)

This reinforces the need for health and social care professionals to evaluate the way that they support older patients through their cancer journey, through effective assessments and MDT working to improve outcomes and quality of care.

Frailty has the potential to impact many patients across their disease pathway journey, not just cancer. It is important for occupational therapists to share best practices in their field, so that we can promote the role of occupational therapy in supporting the nations ageing population to maintain their independence in undertaking ADLS, participating in occupational roles and social engagement.

Some questions to consider…

  • How would you define frailty?
  • What assessments do you use for identifying frailty?
  • What outcomes do you use for older patients who are frail?
  • Which occupational therapy models do you use to guide your practice with working with older patients?
  • What can occupational therapists offer to supporting frail patients through their cancer journey?
  • What examples are there of effective MDT working in your area that could support frailty?
  • What training is available for occupational therapists for managing frailty?

References:

#OTalk 21st November – Occupational Therapy and the STOMP campaign.

This weeks #Otalk is on the topic of “STOMP” and will be hosted by The RCOT People with Learning Disabilities Specialist Section (@RCOT_PLD).

Here is what they had to say…

Choosing a topic has not been easy as we acknowledge there is a lot we can talk about. We asked our members at our annual conference which was hosted at RCOT HQ on 14th October 2017 what they would like to discuss. The decision was occupational therapy and STOMP campaign – Stopping over medication of people with a learning disability, autism or both.

On 14 July 2015, reports were published highlighting widespread inappropriate use of antipsychotics and other medicines used to treat mental illness in people with learning disabilities. Following these reports, NHS England led a ‘call to action’ which brought together representatives of professional and patients groups to make sure changes were made to these inappropriate practices. This led to a pledge to reduce over medication and the start of the STOMP project about stopping the over use of psychotropic medicines. The 3 year project runs until 2019 (NHS England).

It is estimated that every day about 35,000 people with learning disabilities or autism are prescribed psychotropic medicines when they do not have a diagnosed mental health condition, often to manage behaviour which is seen as challenging.

For more information go onto the NHS England website – https://www.england.nhs.uk/learning-disabilities/stomp/

During this #OTalk we would like to gain a better understanding of what occupational therapist think about STOMP and how can we impact the campaign?

The questions we will ask are:

  1. Do you feel confident in discussing medication issues with MDT
  2. Do occupational therapists have a role with reducing challenging behavior
  3. Can occupational therapists support clients to reduce medication?
  4. What practice skills do you use to reduce challenging behavour?

 

Occupational Balance – Saying Goodbye to Valued Occupations

I’m sure the astute among you will notice that I, @kirstyes, haven’t had much involvement in #OTalk of late. New members may indeed wonder who I even am.

When I helped co-found #OTalk six years ago I was in a very different place in my life. I was lecturing in OT and OTalk was a way for me to keep in touch with lots of different aspects of Occupational Therapy and to look at engaging with Occupational Science too.

Tuesday nights were part of my routine and if I wasn’t hosting a chat I’d be taking part in it. It was an extension of my day job AND a leisure activity.

Now I’m back working part time in clinical practice in a specialist field and I started to find that #OTalk started feeling less like fun and more like work. Not in a bad way and the team and the community are awesome but I was finding my capacity for it had diminished.

I won’t bore you with the details but I’ve had my battles with depression and fatigue and I’ve had to consider where to spend my time and energy.

Those of you who have stuck with me through my absence will have spotted that what time that I don’t work I spend reading and doing booky things and may know I harbour an ambition to be a published fiction author. Well it is time for my previous valued occupation to step aside and to be replaced with writing and editing.

I’ve loved my time on the team and have been honoured to work with some fabulous people past and present. It has been great to see the student interns develop into competent practitioners and join the team as full members and I hope the team continues to take on new OT talent and support the OT community with their CPD.

I have asked the team if they are happy for me to still share a connection with #OTalk as Sponsor (I’ll continue paying for the ongoing techie side of things – I’ve also offered research proofreading skills). I’m off to do some CPD this weekend at the MS Trust Conference and in time maybe I’ll pop back to take part in the odd chat.

I hope some of you still consider staying with me on twitter. Especially if you like books, after all if I get one finished I’ll need some people to buy a copy 😜.

<<
ke Hogwarts – OTalk will always be there to welcome you home. We all belong to the Order of the Phoenix.

So, it is with some sadness and also much gratitude that I say goodbye to OTalk and welcome space for a new balance of occupations in my life.

How have you found saying goodbye to valued occupations that you have taken part in?

#OTalk 14th November – Maintaining stroke specialist services in the current commissioning environment.

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Challenges of maintaining stroke specialist services in the current commissioning environment” and will be hosted by the RCOT Specialist Section Neurological Practice- Stroke forum (@OTstrokeSSNP).

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