#OTalk – 11th June 2019 – Occupational Therapy for MND

This weeks topic will explore the role of Occupational Therapy for persons with MND. The chat will be hosted by Lisa Cousins @lisa_mnd_ and MND Education @mndeducation

This is what they had to say:

Motor neurone disease (MND) is a fatal, rapidly progressing neurological condition affecting up to 5,000 adults in the UK at any one time. The disease causes messages from nerves (motor neurones) in the brain and spinal cord that control movement to gradually stop reaching the muscles, leading them to weaken, stiffen and waste.

The result is that people become locked in a failing body, unable to move, talk and eventually breathe. Some may experience changes in thinking and behaviour, with a proportion experiencing a rare form of dementia. MND does not usually affect senses such as sight, hearing and touch.

MND kills a third of people within a year and more than half within two years of diagnosis. It affects people from all backgrounds and a person’s lifetime risk of developing MND around 1 in 300. Today six people will be diagnosed and six will die from MND. There is no cure.

Occupational therapists play a vital role in supporting people with the disease to maximise their quality of life by supporting them to adapt to their changing symptoms and continue to participate in occupations that are important to them. However, supporting people with complex and changing needs, alongside a terminal diagnosis can prove challenging for all involved.  

This #OTalk is being hosted by the MND Association Education and Information Team, and will focus on the role of occupational therapy in MND and the challenges the disease can raise for health and social care professionals. We are really looking forward to hearing about your experiences of working with the disease and creative solutions to the challenges of MND. 

Some questions to get you thinking in preparation for the chat:

  1. What can Occupational Therapists do to help pain management with people living with MND?
  2. What can Occupational Therapists do to help prepare people living with MND for the types of equipment they may need in the future ?
  3. What is the Occupational Therapists role in postural management in MND?
  4. How can Occupational Therapists support social inclusion for people living with MND and their families and carers?
  5. Do Occupational Therapists manage fatigue in MND? (I think people miss this in MND and usually associate it with MS)
  6. Do Occupational Therapists suffer compassion fatigue when working with this client group?

POST CHAT

Online Transcript

#OTalk Transcript June 11th 2019

The Numbers

511.760K Impressions
149 Tweets
24 Participants
119 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

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#OTalk Research 4th June 2019 ‘The NIHR Integrated Clinical Academic Programme: a potential opportunity for occupational therapists’.

This months #OTalk Research topic is “ The NIHR Integrated Clinical Academic Programme: a potential opportunity for occupational therapists”. The chat will be host by Chris Lovegrove @CLovegrove_OT Clinical Lead Occupational Therapist (Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital) and Clinical Research Fellow (CRN South West Peninsula) Chris will be tweeting from the ROTTERs Exeter @ROTTERsExeter account for the chat and Dr Jenny Preston MBE @preston_jenny will be on the @OTalk_ account supporting.
The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) recognises that Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) play a vital role in the delivery of high quality, patient-centered clinical research [1]. As a professional group, AHPs represent the third largest workforce in health & social care and includes Occupational Therapy [2]. Research -active AHPs are at the core of the NIHR mission to support outstanding individuals to conduct leading research focused on the needs of patients and the public [1, 3]. With core principles of participation, meaningful occupation, and holism, occupational therapists are ideally positioned to lead in clinically-relevant frontline research.
In collaboration with Health Education England, the NIHR offer the Integrated Clinical Academic (ICA) programme [4]. This multi-level award programme provides personal research training awards for AHPs who wish to develop careers that combine clinical research and research leadership with continued clinical practice and development. The awards range from introductory research internships through to senior clinical lectureships [4]. While the numbers of occupational therapists applying to these schemes are increasing, they remain relatively low compared to other professions [5].
Whether you are an experienced researcher or clinical academic, clinician, or student, please join us for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experiences. Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus the chat:

  1. What are your experiences of the NIHR ICA scheme?
  2. Are you contemplating applying to the scheme?
  3. How long do you think an application takes?
  4. What preparation do you think goes into an application?

References:
[1] https://www.nihr.ac.uk/our-research-community/clinical-research-staff/Allied%20Health%20Professionals/Allied%20Health%20Professionals%20Strategy%202018_20.pdf
[2] https://www.nihr.ac.uk/our-research-community/clinical-research-staff/allied-health-professionals.htm
[3] https://www.nihr.ac.uk/news/makespace4research-campaign-launched-to-encourage-staff-to-increase-research-capacity/11563?diaryentryid=43708
[4] https://www.nihr.ac.uk/our-research-community/NIHR-academy/nihr-training-programmes/nihr-hee-ica-programme/
[5] https://www.nihr.ac.uk/funding-and-support/documents/ICA/PCAF/TCC-ICA-PCAF-Round%201-Chairs-Report.pdf

POST CHAT

Host: Chris Lovegrove @CLovegrove_OT

Support on the #OTalk account: @preston_jenny

Online Transcript

#OTalk June 4th 2019

The Numbers

815.269K Impressions
230 Tweets
32 Participants
184Avg Tweets/Hour
7Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk 28th May 2019 – Top Tips for Attending Conference (#RCOT2019)

#OTalk 28th May 2019 – Top Tips for Attending Conference

This weeks #OTalk is on the topic of “Top Tips for Conference” and will be hosted by our Kirstie Hughes (@Kirstie_OT).

Here is what Kirstie had to say…

Conference is a great experience for many, it offers a chance to learn, share and be inspired. However, for first time attendees, especially those attending alone, it can seem a little daunting and may not even be aware of that goes on at conference.

This chat aims to discuss the benefits of attending conference and what sessions and events people are looking forward to as well as a chance to share some top tips and answer any questions new attendees may have.

We will also have a cheeky little #OTalkonTour announcement at the end……

 Some questions to consider;

 1; Who is attending RCOT conference this year? Are you a regular or a newbie? For those of you not attending, what factors affected your decision?

2; What are you most looking forward to? Has anything from the programme jumped out at you?

3; What did you enjoy most about the last conference you attended and why? (Not just RCOT).

4; For first time attendees, is there anything that you would like to ask or know?

5; For regular conference goers, what are your top tips for first attending conference?

Any newbies might also want to check out the “Friendly Guide to Attending your first Health Professions Conference” from LG Personal Development

https://www.lgpersonaldevelopment.co.uk/2018/04/09/new-friendly-guide-attending-your-first-health-professionals-conference/

POST CHAT

Host and on the OTalk account – @kirstieot

#OTalk Transcript May 28th 2019

Online Transcript

The Numbers

2.512M Impressions
360 Tweets
32 Participants
288 Avg Tweets/Hour
11 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

#OTalk – 21st May 2019 – Why aren’t all occupational therapists using standardised assessments routinely in practice?

This week’s #OTalk is on the topic of using standardised assessments routinely in practice and will be hosted by Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) from York St John University and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61) in the UK.

Here’s what Alison and Diane had to say:

In the early 1990s, as part of her PhD studies, Alison undertook a small survey of occupational therapists to explore their use of standardised and unstandardised assessments with people with neurological diagnoses. Results (n = 29 OTs) indicated that 93% of OT respondents were using informal observation of ADL, rather than standardised assessment, to assess for perceptual deficits (Laver, 1994). Back then there were a limited number of assessments developed by occupational therapists to choose from, but nearly 30 years later many occupational therapists have been involved with the development and evaluation of standardised assessments and we have evidence of their reliability, validity, sensitivity and clinical usefulness. A look through Asher’s (2014) annotated index of occupational therapy assessment tools reveals that occupational therapists now have 100s of tests to choose from, many of which have been developed by occupational therapists. Yet standardised assessments do not appear to be routinely used in all areas of occupational therapy practice. Why is that?

But nearly 20 years later, a survey of 109 Irish occupational therapists (Stapleton and McBreaty, 2009) still found that “..the consistency of [standardised assessment’ use tended to be low. The barriers to a more consistent use of standardised assessments and outcome measures included time restraints, the unsuitability of the available measures and a lack of sensitivity of the available measures to capture the effectiveness of occupational therapy’ (p55).

Whilst, a much larger study of 794 occupational therapists in the USA (Piernik-Yoder and Beck, 2012, p97) found that paediatric occupational therapists used standardised assessments more than colleagues working with adult patients. They reported: ‘With regard to administrating of standardized assessments, 393 (49.5%) respondents reported that the most common modification they make is to administer portions of standardized assessments, whereas 221 (27.9%) indicated they modify the instruction when administering standardized measures. However, 106 (13.4%) respondents specified they administer standardized measures out of the age range for which the measure is intended, and 66 (8.3%) reported they modify test materials.’

Often students returning from placement report that OTs are using an assessment that has been developed ‘in house’ in the service to fit the particular needs of the client group and the service. Or students report a standardised assessment was being using but in a modified form. Why do some OTs need to modify standardised assessments to make them useful in practice?

The College of Occupational Therapists’ (2017) in their ‘Position Statement: Occupational therapists’ use of standardized outcome measures’ encourages the use of standardised measures and states that ‘without accruing data from such sources the evidence-base to support the value of occupational therapy will fail to grow and the profession will be challenged to produce the robust information that will be essential to support future commissioning of occupational therapy services’ (p1.). So why aren’t all occupational therapists using standardised assessments routinely in practice?

Whether you are an experienced researcher, a clinician or a student please join us  for this #OTalk twitter chat and share your ideas and experience.

Suggested talking points and discussion questions to focus our chat:

1. What standardised assessments do your use – why do you choose to use this / these assessments?
2. How often do you use standardised assessments in practice?
3. Do you use standardised assessments routinely/regularly in your practice? Why or why not?
4. Did you go on any training to learn to administer any of the standardised assessment
you use – what test was the training for and what did the training comprise?
5. Do you make modifications to standardised assessments? If yes, is this to the
instructions or to the materials or you use a portion of the assessment, or administer it but don’t use the scoring?
6. What are the barriers to implementing standardised assessments in practice?
7. What factors support you to use standardised assessments regularly in your
practice?

References:
Asher, I E. (2014) Asher’s Occupational Therapy Assessment Tools: An Annotated Index 4 th ed. Bethesda: American Occupational Therapy Association.

Laver, A J. (1994) The Development of the Structured Observational Test of Function (SOTOF) PhD Thesis. Guildford, University of Surrey.

Piernik-Yoder, P., Beck A (2012) The Use of Standardized Assessments in Occupational Therapy in the United State. Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 26(2–3):97–108.

Stapleton, T., McBreaty, C. (2009) Use of Standardised Assessments and Outcome Measures among a Sample of Irish Occupational Therapists Working with Adults with Physical Disabilities. British Journal of Occupational Therapists, 72 (2) 55-64. Available from: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/030802260907200203 [accessed
17.2.2019]

POST CHAT

Host: Dr Alison Laver-Fawcett (@alisonlaverfaw) and Professor Diane Cox (@dianecox61)

OTalk Support: Rachel @otrach

Online Transcript

#OTalk Transcript May 21st 2019

The Numbers

1.456M Impressions
515 Tweets
42 Participants
412 Avg Tweets/Hour
12 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

Data for #OTalk can be up to 15 minutes delayed

 

#OTalk (Research), 7th May “Developing an Occupational Therapy Research Network”

This week’s #OTalk is hosted by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT). The chat will be co-hosted by @TheRCOT and @DrGillianWard

As part of the development of a new RCOT vision, strategy and action plan for research and development that is fit to guide the profession’s progress and direction of travel over the next 10 years we’ve held 2 previous #OTalk chats to help inform and direct this work.

One of the key themes emerging from the R&D Review and a discussion point with several contributors was a real need to invest in building the occupational therapy research community and network, with the Royal College taking a strong lead in doing this for the profession. Currently, there is no opportunity for occupational therapy researchers to come together to develop a community of practice to share their passion for research and learn how to do it better. Our last #OTalk in September 2018 was focused on Creating a vibrant occupational therapy research community – the way forward. This led to an invited networking and think tank event held at RCOT at the beginning of April 2019 where we used a co-design approach to scope out the “feel, form and function” of an Occupational Therapy Research Network (OTRN).

The purpose of the RCOT OTRN is to support the development of a research community for networking, mentoring, information sharing and to advance research capability and capacity in the occupational therapy profession across the UK. It aims to enable occupational therapists to support each other to develop and use the research evidence base to improve services we are able to offer to the individuals, groups and communities we work with. How might it work? What would it do? We need your help to expand the discussion, and that’s what we’d like to chat with you about during the #OTalk.

We are really looking forward to hearing your thoughts and ideas, which will be a very welcome contribution to the development of the RCOT Occupational Therapy Research Network. If you get a chance ahead of the #OTalk session, it would be really helpful if you could give some thought to the type of network you’d want to join and what would help you engage with it. We’d really love to hear all of the creative ideas that you can come up with as we move into the development phase of the Occupational Therapy Research Network.

The questions forming the basis of our #OTalk discussion are:

1. How do we best support the aim of the network; to support each other to develop and use the research evidence base to improve services we are able to offer?”.  How might it work? What would it do?’
2. What would be the advantages of joining an RCOT Occupational Therapy Research Network? How can we encourage people to join?
3. Many people join networks, but how can we encourage active contribution and participation?
4. The OTRN is likely to be based around a virtual network, what should we consider when designing this?

 

Thank you, I look forward to chatting with you.

Gill Ward, Research and Development Manager, Royal College of Occupational Therapists.

Post Chat

Host: Gill Ward, @DrGillianWard  Research and Development Manager, Royal College of Occupational Therapists.

Otalk Support: @hooper_ek

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript May 7th 2019

Online Transcript

The Numbers

1.054 M Impressions
257 Tweets
26 Participants
206 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#OTalk 30th April 2019 – The Equality Act 2010

equality-act-2010

The OTalk. Team thought it might a good for our CPD to explore and understand UK government, legislation and acts that might impacted on our practise or could inform our knowledge and understanding better,  over the year we will host a number of chat’s looking at these sort of documents,  Please do suggest some for future chats.  

This week Rachel Booth aka @otrach will host a chat, looking at the Equality Act 2010 which cover all areas of the UK however both Scotland and Wales has devotion rights and you can find out more about them at below links.  

I’m not an expert on the equality act but here is a brief over,  and below are the questions that I will be asking during the chat,  followed by a reflect log to fill in after the chat that you can use as some evidence you have engaged in some CDP.

The Equality Act 2010 legally protects people from discrimination in the workplace and in wider society.

It replaced previous anti-discrimination laws with a single Act, making the law easier to understand and strengthening protection in some situations. It sets out the different ways in which it’s unlawful to treat someone.

It is against the law to discriminate against anyone because of:

  • age
  • gender reassignment
  • being married or in a civil partnership
  • being pregnant or on maternity leave
  • disability
  • race including colour, nationality, ethnic or national origin
  • religion or belief
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

These are called ‘protected characteristics’.

You’re protected from discrimination:

  • at work
  • in education
  • as a consumer
  • when using public services
  • when buying or renting property
  • as a member or guest of a private club or association

You’re legally protected from discrimination by the Equality Act 2010.

You’re also protected from discrimination if:

  • you’re associated with someone who has a protected characteristic, for example a family member or friend
  • you’ve complained about discrimination or supported someone else’s case.

You can do something voluntarily to help people with a protected characteristic. This is called ‘positive action’.

Taking positive action is legal if people with a protected characteristic:

  • are at a disadvantage
  • have particular needs
  • are under-represented in an activity or type of work

Disability and the Equity Act

You’re disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities.

  • ‘substantial’ is more than minor or trivial, eg it takes much longer than it usually would to complete a daily task like getting dressed
  • ‘long-term’ means 12 months or more, eg a breathing condition that develops as a result of a lung infection

There are special rules that apply to fluctuating conditions. eg arthritis.

Discrimination can come in one of the following forms:

  • direct discrimination – treating someone with a protected characteristic less favourably than others
  • indirect discrimination – putting rules or arrangements in place that apply to everyone, but that put someone with a protected characteristic at an unfair disadvantage
  • harassment – unwanted behaviour linked to a protected characteristic that violates someone’s dignity or creates an offensive environment for them
  • victimisation – treating someone unfairly because they’ve complained about discrimination or harassment

It can be lawful to have specific rules or arrangements in place, as long as they can be justified.

More detail at https://www.gov.uk/discrimination-your-rights/how-you-can-be-discriminated-against 

Questions during the chat 

  1. Before tonights chat what was you knowledge and understanding of the equity act?
  2. Ok over to you now all please ask one question to hopefully further your knowledge and understanding (everyone is welcome to answer)
  3. How if at all do you think this act impacts on or influences you’re clinical practise?
  4. Is there anything not cover by the act that you think should be considered for future updates of the act?
  5. How can we as occupational therapist influence future acts of parliament?
  6. Don’t forget to fill in the reflective log and do you have any suggestions for future chats about government Policy, legislation and or acts.

Link to Scottish act https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-governments-equality-duties/

Link to welsh act http://www.legislation.gov.uk/wsi/2011/1064/pdfs/wsi_20111064_mi.pdf

References 

 https://www.gov.uk/guidance/equality-act-2010-guidance#history

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/pdfs/ukpga_20100015_en.pdf

Equality Act 2010

POST CHAT

Host and OTalk Support: @otrach

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript April 30th 2019

The Numbers

1.542M Impressions
227 Tweets
23 Participants
182 Avg Tweets/Hour
10 Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants

Data for #OTalk can be up to 15 minutes delayed

#OTalk -23 April 2019 – Continuing Professional Development

Hello #OTalk, this evening we thought it would a good idea to have a general chat about all things Continued Professional Development. It has been a little while since we had a general chat on this topic, but here are a few links to previous chats we have had to help get our thoughts flowing….

#OTalk 10th April 2018 – How to record your CPD

#OTalk 17th October – CPD and service quality

#OTalk 11th July – CPD is more than HCPC audit. How to strategically manage your Continuing Professional Development.

#OTalk 29th March OT – Shifting CPD Focus

The following are some posters and articles that are of course always worth a mention

#COT2017 Clicking your way through continuing professional development? Poster 26

the above poster was also followed up with this article 
Attitudes to social media use as a platform for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) within occupational therapy

and of course  The use of Twitter for continuing professional development within occupational therapy  (Open Access).

As a predominantly UK based chat most of those who join us will be either currently or due to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Whilst engaging in CPD is not all about audit it is wise to ensure that you utilise your CPD activity in a way that will support your profile if are are called for audit. Here is a link to the HCPC’s CPD resources https://www.hcpc-uk.org/cpd/

To aid us in answering your questions please fill in this quick form to help us keep track of the questions and  ensure that we don’t miss any of your questions during the chat My question about CPD for the general chat on 23rd April 2019.

We look forward to asking all your questions of the community and supporting another great chat.

POST CHAT

Host and on the OTalk : @helenotuk

Online Transcript

#OTalk Healthcare Social Media Transcript April 23rd 2019

The Numbers

1.096M Impressions
195 Tweets
27 Participants
156 Avg Tweets/Hour
Avg Tweets/Participant

#OTalk Participants